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Savior Complex: Definition and Common Examples

The savior complex

The savior complex

It is defined by the constant need to try and save people by solving their problems. You have this syndrome, if:

  • you feel attracted by vulnerable individuals
  • you try to change the others, as you believe that you know what is better for them
  • you always feel the need to provide a solution
  • you are under the impression that only you can help them.

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Savior Complex: Definition and Common Examples

Savior Complex: Definition and Common Examples

https://www.healthline.com/health/savior-complex

healthline.com

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Key Ideas

The "savior

Trying to save the others might prove an extremely exhausting goal for the savior. Among the negative effects that this savior syndrome can have:

  • having a burnout 
  • breaking the relationship with the person you are trying to save
  • once you realize you cannot actual save anybody else but you, a feeling of frustration might emerge.

Fighting the savior syndrome

In order to overcome the savior complex:

  • practice active listening rather than active helping
  • talk to the person in need in order to find common ground rather than putting in place your own solution
  • remember that you are in control only of your own life
  • make sure your need to help the others doesn't come from an unsolved personal problem.

Identifying your savior

If you believe that somebody is playing the savior role in your role, try helping them by following the below tips:

  • make sure they understand that their behaviour is welcomed, but not necessary
  • provide a positive example to your savior
  • advise them to reach out for professional help

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