How mindsets affect us - Deepstash
How mindsets affect us

How mindsets affect us

No matter how active we really are, we can hold the mindset that our physical activity level is adequate and healthy, or inadequate and unhealthy, and these mindsets may have real consequences for our well-being.

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MORE IDEAS FROM How exercise recommendations might actually work against us

Experiments conducted in America showed that low and liberal guidelines (from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) led people to adopt a more positive mindset. These positive mindsets led to higher self-efficacy measures. And those with high self-efficacy were more likely to be active the week after viewing the guidelines.

These discoveries raise an important question: How useful are demanding, strict guidelines if they don’t inspire the desired outcome?

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Public health officials should collaborate more with psychologists and modify their exercise messaging.

Improving public health messaging could help people see all the ways in which they’re already getting physical activity in their everyday lives: walking, talking the dog out, or cleaning the house, for example.

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Information vs action

Most of us actually know that exercise is important, but this is not enough to motivate us.

The idea that we only need to educate people and give them the right information and then they will behave better or change their lifestyles is not true.

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We May Not Be Exercising Enough

The World Health Organization recommends 150 to 300 minutes of moderate to heavy exercise per week, which many of us are not doing as we overestimate our activity levels.

A vigorous exercise, where our heart rate reserve is more than 60 percent cannot be the same for every person, as one first needs to calculate their resting heart rate as well as the estimated maximum heart rate.

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We know that spending hour after hour sitting down isn't good for us , but just how much exercise is needed to counteract the negative health impact of a day at a desk? A 2020 study suggests about 30-40 minutes per day of building up a sweat should do it.

Up to 40 minutes of "moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity" every day is about the right amount to balance out 10 hours of sitting still, the research says – although any amount of exercise or even just standing up helps to some extent.

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Exercise Defined

Exercise is a  movement of the body to enhance physical fitness. 

Most people know that exercise is important for the physical development of the self, yet a majority of them are skipping exercise often.

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