Familiar Traits - Deepstash

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I wonder which villains the authors of this study are fond of. 

Familiar Traits

Psychologist Carl Jung had once hypothesized that the traits we find irritating in someone else can tell us a lot about ourselves. Many studies have confirmed this insight.

We seem to be attracted to people who have similar positive traits as ours while being repulsed by people like us who also have negative traits.

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I wonder which villains the authors of this study are fond of. 

I wonder which villains the authors of this study are fond of. 

https://bigthink.com/personal-growth/villian-personality-traits?rebelltitem=1#rebelltitem1

bigthink.com

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Key Ideas

The Villain Inside Us

New studies show that we tend to like villains who are like us. The researchers analyzed the data of thousands of members, revealing that while we like heroes, the villains who look cool and remind us of ourselves are very well-liked.

These studies pave the way for further investigation and research into our interpersonal relationships being affected by our (and others) positive and negative traits. They also explains why we go on loving our loved ones, even after being fully aware of their flaws.

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The hero

Morality matters. People tend to like the good guys and dislike the bad guys.

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Continued comparisons

One study manipulated what characters looked like and measured audience perceptions. They hoped to find out if simple differences in appearance would be enough for viewers to perceive a character as a hero or villain.

The findings indicate that we judge based on comparisons and not because of using an objective standard of morality. Heroes were judged to be more heroic when they appeared after a villain, and villains were judged to be more villainous when they appeared after a hero.

Framing the villain

When an audience sees the evolution of a character whose ethics progressively spiral downward, they don't turn against the character. Instead, they remain loyal to him. especially when the antagonists concurrently get worse with the villain.

It's likely the result of a constant comparison with other characters. It shows the importance of how characters are framed.

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Music increases your creativity

Ambient music at 70 decibels will increase specific creative tasks by activating the parts of the brain that think in abstract ways.

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How We Perceive Abstract Art
How We Perceive Abstract Art

A new study that may be good news for both kinds of art lovers states that abstract art alters our minds cognitive state, causing measurable cognitive changes in the viewer.

Abstract Art and Psychological Distance
  • There is a psychological distance that we create in our minds in relation to other people, things, events and times. Things that are close to us often seem more real and tangible.
  • Abstract art has a noticeable and measurable effect on our general cognitive state as we place it far away in a distant place. When a person views abstract art, the mind strives to find meaning in it, as it appears far away.
  • Normal art is already clear and understandable, making us place it near ourselves as we note small details of the painting.