Jane Jacobs and her biginnings - Deepstash

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Jane Jacobs: New Urbanist Who Transformed City Planning

Jane Jacobs and her biginnings

Jane Jacobs and her biginnings

Born in a Jewish family in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Jane Jacobs is considered a founder of the New Urbanist movement.

What made her vision particular was the fact that she would look at cities as though they were living ecosystems, made up of interconnected elements. Furthermore, she was not into overcrowded cities, but rather well-planned high density. Having always been attracted by the design of the cities, she took up a career in writing on the topic once she moved in New York City and later on in Greenwich Village.

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