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4 Japanese Concepts That Inspire Our Daily Lives

"Mono no aware"

"Mono no aware"

Mono no aware (The pathos of things) describes having empathy towards things and their imminent passing, accompanied with a gentle, sadness that their disappearance is the reality of life.

It allows us to notice the ephemeral beauty of time and to realize that we should take life a step at a time, appreciating everything that passes.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Japanese Concepts That Inspire Our Daily Lives

4 Japanese Concepts That Inspire Our Daily Lives

https://consciousmagazine.co/4-japanese-concepts-that-inspire-our-daily-lives/

consciousmagazine.co

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Key Ideas

"Mottainai"

Mottainai (Too good to waste) is an ancient Buddhist term that translates into having respect for the resources available and to use them with a sense of gratitude.

The respect practice stems from the Shinto belief that objects have souls and therefore should not be discarded.

"Shibui"

Shibui (Perfected simplicity and sophistication) is used to describe an aesthetic principle that values simplicity and the subtle beauty of minimalism.

The seven essential factors of shibui are simplicity, implicitness, modesty, silence, naturalness, everydayness, and imperfection.

"Wabi-sabi"

Wabi-sabi (The beauty of imperfection) is a Japanese aesthetic and worldview accepting transience and imperfection, embracing a beauty that is imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

Derived from Buddhist teachings, its central teachings are around asymmetry, simplicity, asperity, and appreciation of the inherent integrity of natural objects and materials.

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Nostalgia

It is the sentimentality of our past, usually for a particular time and place associated with positive emotions, etched in our memories. Historical texts state it was termed as homesickness ...

A Time Machine

The feeling of nostalgia is like traveling in a time machine. The activities that were once cherished are no longer done, and the world that is remembered no longer exists.

Nostalgia can be a form of self-deception, giving a rosy tint to the past, creating a paradise out of the moments of our lived lives.

Deep nostalgia fosters a sense of serene melancholy and spiritual longing.

Suffering

The deepest form of suffering is a feeling of extreme dissatisfaction about the impermanence and the insubstantiality of everything around us.

Buddhism mentions suffering as inevitable as long as there is desire, lust and a sense of coveting/craving in our lives. Once we grasp this fully, we stop craving and struggling in hope and fear.

Simplicity doesn't mean poverty
Simplicity doesn't mean poverty

Poverty is involuntary and debilitating, whereas simplicity is voluntary and enabling.

It is very misleading to equate simplicity with poverty, even if some spiritual traditions have ...

Simplicity doesn't mean rural living

Adopting a simple life doesn't require moving into rural areas. In fact, the majority of persons choosing a life of conscious simplicity live in cities and suburbs. 

It is much more accurate to describe this as a "make the most of wherever you are" movement, adapting ourselves creatively to a rapidly changing world in the context of big cities and suburbs.

Beauty in the simple life

The simple life is sometimes viewed as an approach to living that advocates a barren plainness and denies the value of beauty and aesthetics. But rather than a denial of beauty, simplicity liberates the aesthetic sense by freeing things from artificial burdens.

The beautiful mess effect
The beautiful mess effect

We don't expect other people to be perfect but appreciate when people show their vulnerabilities and admit errors. Yet, we're afraid to expose our own shortcomings.

Don't waste your experiences

Things fall apart for everyone. If you're wise, you can be resourceful and use the scraps, patch yourself up, and keep going.

Professor Brené Brown states that "vulnerability is courage in you and inadequacy in me." Brown sees the imperfections in people as gifts to be worked with, not embarrassments to be hidden.

The ordinary in extraordinary

The physical evidence of a life well-lived can be a source of pride rather than shame. We don't have to hide the white hair, lined skin, scars, or extra pounds. They can be seen as signs that you persist.

When we expect perfection from everyone, including ourselves, we not only discount much of what is beautiful but create an unrealistic, restrictive, and cruel world where people's flaws are highlighted. Instead, we should highlight the beauty of what we do have, flaws and all, rather than always grasping for more.

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