"Wabi-sabi"

"Wabi-sabi"

Wabi-sabi (The beauty of imperfection) is a Japanese aesthetic and worldview accepting transience and imperfection, embracing a beauty that is imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

Derived from Buddhist teachings, its central teachings are around asymmetry, simplicity, asperity, and appreciation of the inherent integrity of natural objects and materials.

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Self Improvement

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"Mottainai"

Mottainai (Too good to waste) is an ancient Buddhist term that translates into having respect for the resources available and to use them with a sense of gratitude.

The respect practice stems from the Shinto belief that objects have souls and therefore should not be discarded.

"Mono no aware"

Mono no aware (The pathos of things) describes having empathy towards things and their imminent passing, accompanied with a gentle, sadness that their disappearance is the reality of life.

It allows us to notice the ephemeral beauty of time and to realize that we should take life a step at a time, appreciating everything that passes.

"Shibui"

Shibui (Perfected simplicity and sophistication) is used to describe an aesthetic principle that values simplicity and the subtle beauty of minimalism.

The seven essential factors of shibui are simplicity, implicitness, modesty, silence, naturalness, everydayness, and imperfection.

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Suffering

The deepest form of suffering is a feeling of extreme dissatisfaction about the impermanence and the insubstantiality of everything around us.

Buddhism mentions suffering as inevitable as long as there is desire, lust and a sense of coveting/craving in our lives. Once we grasp this fully, we stop craving and struggling in hope and fear.

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IDEAS

The physical evidence of a life well-lived can be a source of pride rather than shame. We don't have to hide the white hair, lined skin, scars, or extra pounds. They can be seen as signs that you persist.

When we expect perfection from everyone, including ourselves, we not only discount much of what is beautiful but create an unrealistic, restrictive, and cruel world where people's flaws are highlighted. Instead, we should highlight the beauty of what we do have, flaws and all, rather than always grasping for more.

Many people have minimalism forced upon them by circumstance. Poverty and trauma can make frivolous possessions seem like a lifeline instead of a burden.

Although many of today's gurus insist that minimalism is useful regardless of income, they target the affluent. The focus on self-improvement is more about accumulation.

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