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What are the three ways to train your brain to be happy?

Social comparison

While comparing yourself to others might not be extremely helpful, comparing yourself to people who are in a less good position than you might actually lead to you feeling better.

So, if you really feel this need, try not comparing yourself but to the ones in an inferior position.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What are the three ways to train your brain to be happy?

What are the three ways to train your brain to be happy?

https://www.bakadesuyo.com/2012/12/train-brain-happy/

bakadesuyo.com

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Key Ideas

Educate your mind to stop being unhappy

Professions like the ones in accounting and law develop a sense of pessimism in the individuals practicing them. However, being obsessed with prudence at work and continue being like this at home is not quite the same thing.

Furthermore, training your mind to stop being focused on finding mistakes is something that will save you some good headaches over the years.

Remember the good

In order to be happy, you must first train your brain to perceive the good that happens to you.

One way to do this is by writing down three good experiences you live on a daily basis: appreciation comes from within, just like happiness.

Give yourself a story you can live with

Whenever you feel like not being able to escape a state of unhappiness, try practicing the so-called retrospective judgment, which will enable you to reinterpret the events lived in order to find what was good in them.

Practicing story-telling when it comes to your life can prove very useful and healthy.

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Their view of life already considers the worst possible outcome as the default one, and anything better than that can only improve it.

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Losing something we already have is twice as much pain than gaining the same. This skewed feelings towards loss is known as loss aversion.

Expectations always dampen the feelings of happiness, always setting us up in advance for a dose of disappointment.

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You’re not feeling so great — whether you realize it or not — and you turn to social media to make you feel better. Only one problem there: it actually makes you feel worse…

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We all know that Facebook doesn’t provide a very well-rounded picture of people’s lives. It’s more like the cherry-picked perfection version.

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Looking at social media for happiness is a bad idea. You won’t find it out there. Your happiness is determined by how you allocate your attention. What you attend to drives your behavior and it determines your happiness. 

Changing behavior and enhancing happiness is as much about withdrawing attention from the negative as it is about attending to the positive.

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