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How to Respond to “Take It or Leave It”

Ignore The Ultimatum

Thinking about choices makes us ignore the false ultimatums provided by the other party. Have the inner confidence to believe that there is still room for negotiation to get what you want, instead of being lulled into thinking that you have to compromise.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Respond to “Take It or Leave It”

How to Respond to “Take It or Leave It”

https://hbr.org/2020/05/how-to-respond-to-take-it-or-leave-it

hbr.org

3

Key Ideas

Take It Or Leave It

The soft ultimatum tactic of the words ‘take it or leave it’ creates a false closure, benefiting the negotiators.

They apply this method to falsely limit your options, by only giving you two, whereas there are a lot more.

The Choice Mindset

Rather than getting influenced by the limited set of options provided to you by the other party (which tricks you into a vortex of limited options), it is better to adopt a choice mindset. One has to let go of the internal limitation of having no choice (which is an illusion, of course). There is always a choice, there is always an option.

Taken to an extreme, this illusion is what triggers suicides, as our limiting mind feels that there is no choice except ending one’s own life, which is entirely false.

Ignore The Ultimatum

Thinking about choices makes us ignore the false ultimatums provided by the other party. Have the inner confidence to believe that there is still room for negotiation to get what you want, instead of being lulled into thinking that you have to compromise.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

BATNA

Refers to your “best alternative to a negotiated agreement,” or the best outcome you can expect if you fail to reach agreement at the bargaining table with your counterpart. 

An e...

Negotiate the process

Carefully negotiate how you will negotiate in advance. Discussing procedural issues will clear the way for much more focused talks.

Don’t assume you’re all on the same page when it comes to determining when to meet, who should be present, what your agenda will be, and so on. 

Building rapport

You and your counterpart may be more collaborative and likely to reach an agreement if you spend even just a few minutes trying to get to know each other.

 If you’re negotiating over email, even a brief introductory phone call may make a difference. This is one of the most valuable negotiation skills to master.

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Negotiation

... is a key life skill, an inherently interpersonal activity that requires a good understanding of human psyche, and it is vital to your success.

Negotiator perform 2 cognitive tasks:
  1. Judgement: Evaluate the content of the available options for its fairness.
  2. Choice: Determine which available option is preferred.
Use a Red Herring

Instead of making one single offer, try offering 3 possible scenarios:

  1.  Something that works for you but can be very expensive for the other party. A win-lose.
  2.  The red herring. Something that is a lose-lose for both parties. An option through which no one wins.
  3. Something that is a middle ground and a win-win for both.
Social psychology shows when you present  more options (the red herring), the other party will rarely decline all the options.

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Types of Negotiators
  • Integrative negotiators: create value between negotiating counterparts.
  • Distributive negotiators: maximize their claim to value in the negotiation at hand.
  • Cr...
Police Negotiation Techniques

They aim to reconcile a counterpart’s problems with the need to maintain the peace for society at large.

Using active-listening techniques, maintaining an open-minded approach, and building rapport to influence one’s counterpart are some of the skills used to resolve conflict and this skills can also be used on other kinds of negotiation.

7 Essential Crisis Negotiation Skills Of a NYPD Negotiator
  • Communication: Opening communication avenues to your counterpart signals you are ready to listen and builds rapport between you.
  • Patience: Allowing your counterpart to air concerns and not jumping to conclusions or rushing towards a resolution also builds rapport.
  • Active Listening: An affective skill that helps to maintain an open dialogue and build trust between counterparts also doubling as information gathering.
  • Respect: Makes your counterpart feel understood and that their concerns are being heard and addressed.
  • Calm: its display helps the counterpart feel there is an alternative way to taking harsh measures.
  • Self-Awareness: It's establishing a relationship with the counterpart while keeping communications strategic and purposeful.
  • Adaptability: Is to adapt and respond to changing circumstances in a way that further negotiation goals.