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Mind going a million miles a minute? Slow down with this breathing exercise

Breathing Exercises

Mindfulness can get our thinking brain back to being usable and free, as it acts as a junk cleaner of our mind. As meditation can be challenging for many, one can use a simple breathing exercise to ‘reboot’ the RAM in our brains. This is known as the Five Finger Breathing.

Five Finger Breathing makes the use of many of your senses, including eyesight and touch along with an awareness of the multiple locations in your body, like your hands, nose and lungs. This helps you get back to reality and insulates you from the ongoing worry.

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Mind going a million miles a minute? Slow down with this breathing exercise

Mind going a million miles a minute? Slow down with this breathing exercise

https://ideas.ted.com/mind-going-a-million-miles-a-minute-slow-down-with-this-breathing-exercise/?utm_source=recommendation&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=explore&utm_term=ideas-blog-3

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Key Ideas

The Brain During Periods Of Worry

During periods of panic, anxiety or confusion, one of the best strategies is to slow down and focus on your breath. Yes this is not new, and many people know about this, and still are not able to implement.

Our brains’ dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the thinking and planning department, is our short-term working memory, just like the RAM in our computers. If we occupy the RAM space of our brain with too much worry, the working memory can crash.

Breathing Exercises

Mindfulness can get our thinking brain back to being usable and free, as it acts as a junk cleaner of our mind. As meditation can be challenging for many, one can use a simple breathing exercise to ‘reboot’ the RAM in our brains. This is known as the Five Finger Breathing.

Five Finger Breathing makes the use of many of your senses, including eyesight and touch along with an awareness of the multiple locations in your body, like your hands, nose and lungs. This helps you get back to reality and insulates you from the ongoing worry.

The Five Finger Breathing

  • Keep your index finger of one hand on your other hand’s little finger (the outside of the hand). Breathe in, tracing the little finger up to the tip, and breathe out tracing it down to the inside.
  • On the next inhale, trace your ring finger on the same way, going to the tip and then going inside on the exhale.
  • Do this for all fingers and then reverse the process from the thumb back again to your little finger.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

What mindfulness is

What mindfulness is

Mindfulness is the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.

What meditation is

Meditation is exploring. When we meditate we venture into the workings of our minds: sensations, emotions and thoughts.

Mindfulness meditation asks us to suspend judgment and unleash our natural curiosity about the workings of the mind, approaching our experience with warmth and kindness, to ourselves and others.

Jon Kabat-Zinn

Jon Kabat-Zinn

“Mindfulness is awareness that arises through paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally. And then I sometimes add, in the service of self-understanding and wisdom.”

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Sama Vritti or “Equal Breathing”

How it’s done:  Inhale for a count of 4, then exhale for a count of 4, all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath. Once you manage it, you can go up to a c...

Abdominal Breathing Technique

How it’s done: With one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, take a deep breath in through the nose, ensuring the diaphragm inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs. The goal: 6 to 10 deep, slow breaths per minute for 10 minutes each day to experience immediate reductions to heart rate and blood pressure.

When it works best: Before an exam, or any stressful event.

Nadi Shodhana or “Alternate Nostril Breathing”

How it’s done: Starting in a comfortable meditative pose, hold the right thumb over the right nostril and inhale deeply through the left nostril. At the peak of inhalation, close off the left nostril with the ring finger, then exhale through the right nostril. Continue the pattern, inhaling through the right nostril, closing it off with the right thumb and exhaling through the left nostril.

When it works best: Crunch time, or whenever it’s time to focus or energize.

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Anger And The Trauma String

Anger And The Trauma String

Any event that triggers our anger can be only seen by us completely, as it lights up various ‘bulb’s inside our minds, triggering many sleeping emotions, which are invisible to others and that make...

Vicarious Trauma

It happens when other people's bad experience is reimagined by you, sparking memories of your own similar experience, triggering strong reactions.

Deeply buried events that were supposedly forgotten are resurfaced, leading to traumatic feelings that can be hard to understand by others, like grief, frustration, helplessness and agitation.

Anger Is Good

Anger, surprisingly, can be constructive, an active ingredient to energize and motivate a person. It can be useful and powerful if channelled in the right way. The adrenalin that flows during a fit of anger can blind a person if not handled appropriately.

If left unchecked, anger can lead to nightmares, chronic anxiety, and panic attacks.

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