Putting your knowledge and skills in perspective - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

How to Be More Confident

Putting your knowledge and skills in perspective

Putting your knowledge and skills in perspective

When you're feeling notably uncertain about a something, take the time perform an audit, in the objective terms possible.

Ask yourself: What is my knowledge base, and what are my previously demonstrated skills? The former might be lacking, but the latter often equips me to learn quickly.

941 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Be More Confident

How to Be More Confident

https://99u.adobe.com/articles/66183/how-to-be-more-confident

99u.adobe.com

4

Key Ideas

Putting your knowledge and skills in perspective

When you're feeling notably uncertain about a something, take the time perform an audit, in the objective terms possible.

Ask yourself: What is my knowledge base, and what are my previously demonstrated skills? The former might be lacking, but the latter often equips me to learn quickly.

Playing the part

Competency requires practice. It doesn't get easier overnight.

Playing the part doesn't mean to just fake it, even if there are some benefits to that, too. Instead, by diving in and doing the work even if you don’t feel 100% prepared, your skillset will start to improve as you get more practice.

Clarifying questions in uncertain situations

When you’re really unsure, asking questions may be last thing you'd want to do, because it could feel like turning on a spotlight when all you want to do is go unnoticed. But masking uncertainty tends to amplify it.

In many situations, questions are an important tool: the more comfortable you get asking for clarification or help, the smoother the path is down the road.

Doubt as a strategy

In the right amounts, self-doubt can lead to self-improvement. For this to happen, you need to be able to identify your weak points without spiraling into despair.

Progress starts by zeroing in on areas you need to strengthen and seeking out the relevant information you need to improve.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Forever Employable: Brand Yourself
Forever Employable: Brand Yourself

As we climb up the corporate ladder, there are fewer options available, and a mid-life crisis of the corporate world comes. The reason is that the same skills that got a person hired as a young gra...

Reimagine the Second Half of Your Career

There are five core concepts to keep in mind as you think about the second half of your career:

  • The entrepreneurial mindset : Your life is not to be sold to a person who can give you a monthly paycheck (however large it is) but has to be moulded and perfected so that it becomes your business.
  • Self-confidence: It may seem like everything related to management, digital transformation, marketing and sales has been told already, and sharing your own experience would not be something new. What is to be understood is that your own experience has a unique value, which no one has or can steal from you.
  • Continuous learning: Staying curious and well informed will help you to shape your brand.
  • Continuous improvement: Being enthusiastically skeptical is a great strategy for a constant endeavour to improve oneself, and finding a better way to do one’s task.
  • Reinvention: Being forever employable means that you have to reinvent the core aspects of yourself.
You’re Choosing To Live The Way You Live Right Now
You’re Choosing To Live The Way You Live Right Now

We are responsible for the life we’re living right now. If your life is boring, you have the power to make changes.

Feeling helpless won’t be beneficial in the long term. S...

Keeping The Outside World Happy

There’s so much pressure to live our lives in a specific way (from society and our families) and most of us fall for the trap of pleasing the expectations of others.

But you’re the one living your live and so there is no one more capable to decide what your life should look like.

Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs

"Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life."

2 more ideas

Picking up what you want to achieve
Picking up what you want to achieve

The first component to achieving something is picking it.

It has to be something tangible, but that is currently not tangible to you: it has to be something you currently d...

Common backup learning styles
  • Imagining: coming up with ideas.
  • Reflecting: learning about the ideas you come up with.
  • Analyzing: synthesizing the ideas you’re learning and making strategic plans about how to use them.
  • Deciding: choosing a specific way to go with a specific idea.
  • Acting: taking action toward the attainment of your idea
  • Experiencing: learning from multiple angles.
Learning and mindsets
  • Most of us have a growth mindset about the learning style that come easy to us. For example, if you like math, you probably believe you can get better at math and you approach challenges and failures in your learning process as opportunities to grow.
  • Also, most of us have a fixed mindset about the learning styles we struggle with. For example, if you don’t like writing, you probably believe you can’t get better at it.

2 more ideas

Bruce Feiler

“Perhaps the most important thing I learned in more than a thousand hours of interviews is that a life transition..."

Bruce Feiler
Lifequakes

They are the transitions and moments of disruption that offer unique opportunities for insight and wisdom.

The constant handling of big and small obstacles and setbacks, ironically, is what provides meaning to our lives. It is almost as if a Gateway or threshold has to be crossed, signifying the commitment of the journey from the ‘Hero’ who is able to successfully complete the ‘test of life’.

Autobiographical Occasions

Life transitions are the interesting chapters of our internal autobiographies, that provide us with the opportunity, tools and the reason to transform ourselves for the better.

We need to take small steps, or ‘microsteps’ to accept these transition moments, visualize and plan out the change, shed our old ways, unveil our transformation and the resulting new self, and to storify the entire transition.

3 more ideas

Helping a loved one
Helping a loved one

Many people try to help a loved one make significant life changes but fail. They may try to help a spouse quit smoking or get a roommate out of an abusive relationship. They may feel that if they d...

Different forms of enabling behavior

Enabling may accidentally happen when you are trying to help, but after an extended period, you realise that you are really helping.

  • Cleaning up after someone is one form of enabling behavior and includes any way of protecting the person from the negative consequences of their own behavior.
  • A partner lies to his in-laws about his wife's drug problem to protect her from embarrassment.
  • A sibling pays his brother's rent because he regularly loses his money to gambling.

It might be okay if it happened once, but if these "rescues" happen repeatedly, they don't get to learn from the cause-and-effect pattern of their behaviors.

Giving someone non-specific help
  • Our loved ones often come to us in a moment of crisis. They're losing their job or need to pay someone back. We sometimes feel we have to give money or bail them out in some form. But after a time or two, you become the consistent rescuer while they continue in their unaccountable ways.
  • Boundaries can be used to stop the cycle, but not letting those boundaries slip is hard. If you put your foot down on not loaning money, don't give in. The person you're trying to help will ultimately feel more secure if they know you keep your word. You're also a good role model for consistent behavior.

2 more ideas

Writing down our memories
Writing down our memories

There is a difference between seeing - which is passive - and writing down something you have seen, something you have heard, something you have experienced. Writing it down captures the me...

Writing to bear witness
  • Brainstorm and jot it down: Start with the prompt, "The time when..." List at least ten things.
  • Narrow it down and focus: Go back to your list of ten and pick three things that are really bothering you, and you feel strongly about. Take 30 minutes of uninterrupted time to write. Focus on the details, the order of events, and especially how they made you feel.
  • Pick one and tell your story: You don't have to write a memoir or be a creative writer. You can also write it from someone else's perspective. Writing it down is to say that this thing did happen.
Working alone
Working alone

Being in a space that's free from distractions while managing your time may sound perfect. But working alone is not a cure-all. Remote work can make you realize that the battle was neve...

Going with the flow

Elements to help you reach a state of flow.

  1. There are specific goals every step of the way.
  2. There is immediate feedback to your actions.
  3. There is a balance between challenges and skills.
  4. Action and awareness are merged.
  5. Distractions are excluded from consciousness.
  6. There is no worry of failure.
  7. Self-consciousness disappears.
  8. The sense of time becomes distorted.
  9. The activity becomes autotelic.

To allow this deep work to occur requires you to be vigilant about outside interruptions.

The ability to face distractions

Solitude can initially make you squirm but later becomes a bedrock for intense concentration and creativity. Deflect distractions and use solitude to your advantage:

  • Listen to the sounds of nature. It calms the storm of thoughts and allows you to focus on the task at hand.
  • Accept imperfection. Don't chase an "ideal" work environment; accept what you have.

2 more ideas

Second-person self-talk and increased performance
Second-person self-talk and increased performance

A series of studies have confirmed that speaking to yourself can influence your performance. When comparing the effectiveness of self-talk using first person pronouns "I can d...

Research on self-talk for endurance
  • Individual variation. Not everyone benefits from the second-person self-talk. People with more narcissistic tendencies use first-person pronouns more frequently, making them more or less sensitive to the effect.
  • Customized self-talk for athletes. Framing self-statements in a positive light tend to be encouraging and actionable. For example, changing "keep grinding" to "I (You) can keep going."
Telling our origin story
Telling our origin story

Stories of origin come in many forms - how we became part of an organization, or how we emerged as a new person after a crisis.

However, we seldom examine what we include a...

Leadership origin stories

Research found four dominant themes of origin stories among leaders: being, engaging, performing, and accepting.

These themes act as lenses, contributing to how leaders see themselves.

The "being" leadership story

Leaders who use this lens always thought of themselves as leaders. They admit to having a natural call to leadership that started in childhood.

In current leadership, people who use this lens often note personal qualities such as confidence, optimism, and natural leadership styles.

5 more ideas