Dismissive Or Avoidant Attachment Style

  • Many people find it uncomfortable to trust the other person or to get too emotionally close.
  • They are self-sufficient and do not need emotional intimacy.
  • They quickly pull away and ‘go in a cave’ when rejected or hurt.
  • Having negligent or abusive parents is associated with people having this style, and they often suppress their internal need for love and care.

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Love & Family

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Attachment Styles

We all have a personal bonding style, which is based early on in life according to our upbringing and how we act, feel and think in a close relationship.

Attachment is our bond with our first caregiver, which is usually a parent. The style we form while growing up usually stays with us in adulthood and beyond.

  • When a partner has a secure attachment style, they feel comfortable and confident in their relationship and in their significant other.
  • There is a feeling of connectedness, trust, and freedom as both the partners let the other have independence and offer full support all the time.
  • A strong and secure life amply supported by one’s parents builds the foundation of this style.
  • Some people are always craving for emotional intimacy, even when the other person is not serious or romantic.
  • They are in a constant need of approval and reassurances from their partner, and tend to be anxious when the other person isn’t providing any.
  • These people are dependent on others for their self-worth and are often involved with people who don’t like this clingy style.
  • Some people are doing the opposite of what should ideally be done.Their internal fears and their avoidant attitude are a paradox, and they cannot figure out if they want emotional closeness or not.
  • They deny their own feelings and never fully trust the other person.
  • The feelings of jealousy and rivalry come easily to them.
  • This style is often the result of some major loss or trauma in their lives, which made them never take security and closeness for granted.

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Social ambiguity

Social life can be full of uncertainty. Friends don't always smile back at you. Strangers sometimes look upset. The question is how you interpret these situations. Do you take everything personally or do you think there are reasons they behave that way that has nothing to do with you?

While most people tend to overcome socially ambiguity with ease, knowing it is unavoidable, other people tend to see themselves as perpetual victims. They believe that one's life is entirely under the control of forces outside one's self.

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IDEAS

Electronic communication is efficient, but it's detached. Sitting at a computer screen, the need for tact and a respectful tone disappears.

  • Being on the receiving end of such impoliteness can create lingering stress and negative emotions. The recipient may find it harder to stay engaged at work. The stress associated with e-mail rudeness can spill over into family life and, like a chain reaction, can send stress signals to other people.
  • A subtler form of aggression is failing to reply to a request, in effect giving others the "silent treatment." Not responding to an email leaves people hanging and struggling with uncertainty.
  • GNW argues that consciousness arises from a specific type of information processing, known from the beginnings of AI, when specialized programs would access a small, shared repository of information.
  • According to GNW, consciousness is when incoming sensory information is broadcast to multiple cognitive systems, which process these data to speak, store, or call up memory.
  • The network of neurons that broadcast these messages is thought to be located in the frontal and parietal lobes.
  • When the data is broadcast on this network, the subject becomes conscious.
  • GNW proposes that computers of the future will be conscious.

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