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The Dangers of Having Too Little To Do

We Have To Keep Engaging Our Minds

Our work has a little known value: protecting us from a sense of despair and agony, and keeping us from doing the most difficult task: Doing Nothing.

The mind has to be kept engaged by providing it with mild challenges, one after the other, to keep it from falling into an abyss doom and terror.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Dangers of Having Too Little To Do

The Dangers of Having Too Little To Do

https://www.theschooloflife.com/thebookoflife/the-dangers-of-having-too-little-to-do/

theschooloflife.com

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Key Ideas

The Nature Of Work

Work, by definition, requires continuous effort, as completing anything of value, like attaining a college degree, building a business or writing a book, is a slow and steady process which spans months or years.

The unpleasant aspects of work provide us with a sort of satisfaction and happiness, and not having any challenge can strangely feel uncomfortable and hollow.

When Doing Nothing Becomes Difficult

The mind seems terrified of the states of calm and relaxation as if work was a distraction to not let the mind come close to the worries and the existential queries. It saddles us with guilt and shame on the life we have lived, and the things that never materialized.

Doing nothing, it seems, becomes harder than doing any work that fills our time and keeps our mind engaged.

We Have To Keep Engaging Our Minds

Our work has a little known value: protecting us from a sense of despair and agony, and keeping us from doing the most difficult task: Doing Nothing.

The mind has to be kept engaged by providing it with mild challenges, one after the other, to keep it from falling into an abyss doom and terror.

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