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Counterfactual Thinking

Counterfactual Thinking

Thinking in a counterfactual way is a non-mainstream mode of thinking about the alternatives of a present situation or turn of events.

It means imagining possible alternatives to events that have already happened; something that is contrary to what really occurred.

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  • Counterfactual thinking makes us look at the events from multiple angles, making us mentally experience it from a different spectrum.
  • Thinking with a counterfactual bend of mind boosts creativity in solving future challenges.
  • It helps the thinker store important information that could impact the analysis and solutions of future events.
  • A non-linear, non-mainstream way of thinking avoids the usual pitfalls of anger, anxiety, fear and grief when things go wrong. This sort of action-oriented approach comes with a positive bend of mind and a desire to do something, instead of getting stuck in an endless loop of worry and anxiety.

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