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Appeal to Force/Fear - Argumentum ad Baculum

The Appeal to Force

The Appeal to Force

This fallacy occurs when a person makes a threat of physical or psychological violence against others if they refuse to accept the conclusions offered. It can also happen when a person claims that accepting a conclusion or idea will lead to harm or disaster.

Children are more prone to this fallacy when they say, "If you don't agree, I'll punish you!"

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Appeal to Force/Fear - Argumentum ad Baculum

Appeal to Force/Fear - Argumentum ad Baculum

https://www.thoughtco.com/appeal-to-force-fear-250346

thoughtco.com

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Key Ideas

An Examples of the Appeal to Force

Adults use the fallacy more subtly.

"If you don't support the spending bill to develop better airplanes, our enemies will think we are weak and will attack us at some point, killing millions." The person offering this argument is using psychological pressure to get agreement. There is no apparent connection between "our enemies" and the conclusion that it will be in the country's best interest.

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The mind races on to the next negative consequence like a downward spiral, creating fear and anxiety.

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Begging the question example

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The Hypostatization Fallacy can be explained by studying the following statement: “The government has a hand in everybody's business and another in every person's pocket. By limiting such governmental pickpocketing, we can limit its incursions on our freedom.”

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