The construal-level theory - Deepstash

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How to Brainstorm — Remotely

The construal-level theory

Distance, whether physical, time-oriented, or social, makes the human mind think in an abstract manner. This is known as the construal-level theory.

Being physically distant from the problem at hand makes our viewpoint abstract, which can help us provide a birds-eye view of the problem and associate it with our own area of expertise, forming useful analogies and connections.

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