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The Relationship Between Nature and Culture

Nature vs Culture

Nature vs Culture

Nature is often seen as the opposite of culture - nature cannot be the result of human interference, and cultural development is achieved against nature.

There is also another take on the relationship between nature and culture. Studies suggest that culture is part of the ecological niche.

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The Relationship Between Nature and Culture

The Relationship Between Nature and Culture

https://www.thoughtco.com/nature-culture-divide-2670633

thoughtco.com

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Key Ideas

Nature vs Culture

Nature is often seen as the opposite of culture - nature cannot be the result of human interference, and cultural development is achieved against nature.

There is also another take on the relationship between nature and culture. Studies suggest that culture is part of the ecological niche.

Education: An Effort Against Nature

Modern authors such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau saw education as an effort against the tendencies of human nature.

Humans start out with wild dispositions using violence to achieve their desires, be disorganized, and act egotistically. Education uses culture to interfere with our natural tendencies and accomplish the opposite.

Adapting To The Environments We Live In

Studies in the history of human development show that culture in an anthropological sense is part of adapting to the environmental conditions we live in.

For example, hunting allowed hominoids to move from the forest into the savannah, changing their diet and living habits. The invention of weapons developed into a series of skill sets charaterizing our cultural profile, from butchering tools to ethical rules about the proper use of weapons.

Culture as an Ecological Niche

Over the past decades, the view that came to be most plausible is that culture is part of the ecological niche within which humans live. Through the ages, we bring our culture along with us.

Our imparting of culture does not seem to be directly related to genetic information. It is also horizontal among individuals within the same generation. You can learn to make lasagna or speak another language even if you have not been exposed to it from the start.

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