Positive and negative aspects of our dark side - Deepstash

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The Light Triad vs. Dark Triad of Personality

Positive and negative aspects of our dark side

  • In studies, the dark triad was positively correlated with being younger, male, motivated by power, immature defense style, selfishness.
  • The dark triad was negatively correlated with life satisfaction, conscientiousness, agreeableness, values, compassion, empathy, a quiet ego, a belief in the good of people and self.
  • The dark triad positively correlated with utilitarian moral judgment, assertiveness, and the strengths of creativity, bravery, and leadership. There was also a connection between the dark triad and curiosity.

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The Paradox Of Our Dark Side
The Paradox Of Our Dark Side

In a world that is thought to be black and white, where the good is desirable and the bad is looked down upon, each one of us has a dark side, which according to conventional wisdom, is to ...

Light And Dark Triads

Our personalities have two distinct triads: The Light Triad and The Dark Triad. The dark ones sometimes overlap with the light ones to form a complete personality.

The Dark Triad, which is associated with the Seven Deadly Sins (Lust, Anger, Greed, Sloth, Gluttony, Pride and Envy) seems to be very fascinating, with many researchers drawn towards it just like viewers are drawn to serial-killer shows and murder mysteries.

The Dark Area Of Our Personalities

There are certain personality traits in literature that fall under the Dark Triad:

  • Machiavellianism: A tendency to strategically exploit or deceive other people.
  • Subclinical Narcissism: It means focusing towards the self, giving oneself entitlement and importance.
  • Subclinical Psychopathy: A tendency to be insensitive and cruel with regards to others.
"Indifference of the indicator"
"Indifference of the indicator"

Over 100 years ago, Charles Spearman made discoveries about human intelligence. One is that the general factor of intelligence (g-factor) conforms to the principle of the "indiffer...

The dark traits of personality

We all know people who consistently display ethically, morally and socially unreasonable behavior. Personality psychologists refer to these characteristics as "dark traits."

Researchers emphasize that these dark traits are related to each other, so they suggest that a D-factor exists. This is defined as the basic tendency to maximize one's own goal at the expense of others, and believing that one's malicious behaviors are justified.

Scoring high on the Dark factor
  • Those who score high on the D-factor aren't always uncooperative, as they can be very strategic in choosing when to cooperate.
  • Those scoring high on the D-factor will not be motivated to help others in need without it benefiting themselves.
Social ambiguity
Social ambiguity

Social life can be full of uncertainty. Friends don't always smile back at you. Strangers sometimes look upset. The question is how you interpret these situations. Do you take everythin...

The victimhood mindset

Researchers found the tendency for interpersonal victimhood consists of four main dimensions:

  • Always seeking recognition for one's victimhood: Those who score high on this dimension have a constant need to have their suffering acknowledged. It is also normal for victims to want the perpetrators to take responsibility for their wrongdoing.
  • Moral elitism: Those who score high on this dimension perceive themselves as having perfect morality while viewing everyone else as immoral. They view themselves as persecuted, vulnerable and morally superior.
  • Lack of empathy for the pain and suffering of others: People who score high on this dimension are so preoccupied with their own victimhood that they are unaware of the pain and suffering of others.
  • Frequently thinking of past victimization: Those scoring high on this dimension continuously think about their interpersonal offences and their causes and consequences rather than about possible solutions.
Mindset and self-image in interpersonal conflicts

In interpersonal conflict, all parties are motivated to maintain a positive moral self-image. However, different parties are likely to create very different subjective realities. Offenders tend to downplay the severity of the transgression, and victims tend to perceive the offenders' motivations as immoral.

The mindset one develops - as a victim or a perpetrator - affects the way the situation is perceived and remembered.