Online and offline networks - Deepstash

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What Do We Learn from Our Networks?

Online and offline networks

There are four ways in which online networks differ from offline networks.

  • Scale: It is possible to interact with a huge number of other individuals online.
  • Communality: Online networks facilitate large-scale cooperation.
  • Specificity: It is very easy to find a specific kind of person very quickly, such as online communities with particular interests and tastes.
  • Virtuality: People can pretend to be someone they are not on the internet, for instance, a man can have a female avatar or a woman a male avatar.

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We are essentially ‘story finders’ looking for meaning, narrative and shape in everything around us. We tend to not believe in improbable...

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Our tendency to give a ‘face’ and a story to a group or collection of people made us invent a dominant leader of the group, like the President, or the Team Captain, or the Monarch.

How Fame Alters Our Perceptions
  • The popularity or fame of an individual or a piece of art (like a painting, song or a movie) alters how we perceive it.
  • The characteristics and behaviour of the people among whom fame spreads matters more than the actual merit or quality.
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Wireless communication before cellular technology
Wireless communication before cellular technology

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How cellular systems are different

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What is amazing about the development of cellular systems is that it automatically switched which base station the phone talks to as its location changed.

Major improvements to cellular networks
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  • The second-generation systems digitized your voice, then send it as a data link to improve stability and security. It could also transmit data across, making it useful to send photos or information, but data moved too slow.
  • Subsequent cellular network generations used increasingly wider bandwidths and were powered by a denser network of base stations.
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Neuronal Correlates of Consciousness (NCC)

The whole brain can be considered an NCC because it generates experience continually.

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  • The next stages of processing are the broad set of cortical regions, collectively known as the posterior hot zone, that gives rise to conscious perception. In clinical sources of causal evidence, stimulating the posterior hot zone can trigger a diversity of distinct sensations and feelings.
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