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Double Standards: What They Are and How to Respond to Them

Avoid applying double standards yourself

Make sure that whenever you treat similar things differently, you have valid justification for doing so.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Double Standards: What They Are and How to Respond to Them

Double Standards: What They Are and How to Respond to Them

https://effectiviology.com/double-standard/

effectiviology.com

6

Key Ideas

The double standard

The double standard is a principle or policy that is applied in a different way to similar things, with no legitimate explanation. Thus, a double standard happens when two or more individuals or groups, are handled differently, when they should be handled the same way.

We can encounter double standards in many ares of our lives: in the actions of individuals and groups that apply different forms of favoritism and discrimination, such as sexism or racism.

Double standard examples

  • A person who judges and criticizes another person for doing something, even though this person does that very same thing repeatedly and doesn’t see an issue with it when they’re the ones doing it.
  • Treating similar employees differently when they do the same thing, by punishing one and rewarding the other, even though there is no proper, valid reason.

Why double standards happen

  • Using double standards intentionally involves an informed, conscious decision to do so and happens mostly when a person thinks that the double standards could help them achieve some goal (helping someone that they favor, hurting someone that they dislike etc.)
  • Using double standards unintentionally means a person fails to acknowledge the double standard, and is generally driven by some motivation, often emotional in nature.

Identifying double standards

To find out if you're dealing with a double standard or not, consider these 2 questions:

  • Are two (or even more) things (persons, situations etc.) being treated differently?
  • If there is a different treatment, is there a proper, valid justification for it?

A double standard occurs when there is unequal treatment that is not properly justified.

Responding to a double standard

  • Make sure that you're really dealing with a double standard and start asking the person in question to explain their reasoning.
  • Emphasize the logical and moral concerns related to the double standard you're considering and help the person applying the standard internalize those concerns.
  • If none of the above ideas work, choose an alternative one based on the circumstance (for example, you can try escalating the issue to someone who can resolve it or put a distance between you and the the person who’s applying the double standard).

Avoid applying double standards yourself

Make sure that whenever you treat similar things differently, you have valid justification for doing so.

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Types of Essential Oils

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  • Sandalwood: helps with focus and calming of nerves.
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Using Essential Oils

Essential Oils are widely used to treat certain health conditions and problems. Some claim that these oils can help with:

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The empathy gap

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Examples of empathy gaps

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The empathy gap can cause people to be unprepared for situations and act differently to what they would ideally prefer.

Types of empathy gaps
  • Cold-to-hot empathy gaps. When someone is in a cold (emotionally neutral) state, they have trouble understanding someone in a hot (emotional state). A calm person might be unable to predict how they will act when they're upset.
  • Hot-to-cold empathy gaps. Someone in this state might be passionate about a topic but fail to understand how other people feel that are not passionate about it.
  • Intrapersonal bias. An interpersonal empathy gap occurs when someone struggles to consider their own thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.
  • Interpersonal bias. An interpersonal empathy gap occurs when people battle to consider someone else's thoughts, emotions, and behaviors.
  • Retrospective bias. A retrospective empathy gap occurs when people fail to understand why they acted emotionally in the past.
  • A prospective bias. A prospective empathy gap occurs when people fail to predict the future behavior of someone who doesn't care about the same thing as much.
  • The outgroup empathy gap. This is a cognitive bias that causes people to be more empathic towards members of their ingroup than toward people in their outgroup.

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Using The Benjamin Franklin Effect
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  • Research shows that being kind to someone increases how much you like that person.
  • Being asked a favor can make one feel acknowledged for their expertise, which can cause them to develop more positive feelings toward the person asking for help.
  • The negative Benjamin Franklin effect happens when people who do something negative to someone will increase the degree to which they dislike that person, in order to justify their negative actions to themselves.
The Benjamin Franklin Effect

A psychological phenomenon that causes people to like someone more after they do them a favor, especially if they dislike the helped person. 

You can use it to benefit and protect yourself when interacting with others.

A person with phobia:
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Basic structure of an argument from incredulity

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Premise 2: if a certain proposition is true, then I must be able to explain or imagine how that can be.

Conclusions: proposition X is false.

It’s ok to be incredulous

... and to bring this up as part of an argument. The issue with doing so occurs when this incredulity isn’t justified or supported by concrete information, and when this lack of belief is used in order to assume that a preferred personal explanation must be the right one, despite the lack of proof.

At the same time, it’s also important to remember that it’s possible that the person using the argument from incredulity is right, despite the fact that their reasoning is flawed.

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They can be defined as unpleasant or unhappy emotions evoked in individuals to express a negative effect towards something.

Although some are labeled negative, all emotions are normal to the human experience. And it’s important to understand when and why negative emotions might arise, and develop positive behaviors to address them.

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Jumping into Conclusions
Jumping to conclusions is a common phenomenon, where people prematurely decide and finalize something, without having sufficient information or choosing not to consider it.
Jumping into Conclusions: Examples
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  • Fortune-Telling: Assumption of knowing exactly what will happen in the future.
  • Mind Reading: Assuming based on how to have read someone's mind and concluded something which may not be true.
  • Extreme Extrapolation: Finding a minor clue and making something major out of it.
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  • Labeling: Stereotyping a set of people based on their likes and dislikes.
Why We Jump to Conclusions

The reason people jump to conclusions is the fact that they find it easy.

Fact-checking and 100 percent accuracy on everything they see or observe consume way too much time for a normal person.

Taking mental shortcuts is the path most people choose to jump to conclusions.

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