Being a productivity junkie - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

When productivity becomes an addiction

Being a productivity junkie

Being a productivity junkie

The brain can become addicted to productivity just as it can to other addiction sources, such as drugs, gambling, or shopping.

As with all addictions, the desire for the stimulant continues to increase while withdrawal symptoms include increased anxiety, depression, and fear.

492 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

When productivity becomes an addiction

When productivity becomes an addiction

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200807-when-productivity-becomes-an-addiction

bbc.com

6

Key Ideas

Being a productivity junkie

The brain can become addicted to productivity just as it can to other addiction sources, such as drugs, gambling, or shopping.

As with all addictions, the desire for the stimulant continues to increase while withdrawal symptoms include increased anxiety, depression, and fear.

Society encourages workaholics

What makes addiction to productivity complicated is that society tends to reward it - the more you work, the better. A workaholic might be earning a lot of money, but in the long run, the detrimental effects outweigh the short-term benefits.

Addiction affects the brain's reward system. It results in compulsive behavior while disregarding harmful consequences.

Obsession with productivity

At the root of obsession with productivity is a fear of wasting time. Everything is seen as either productive or unproductive.

Buying groceries is seen as productive because you have to eat, while a hobby is viewed as unproductive. Productivity junkies are overly focused on a single aspect of their life. Potential sources of pleasure, such as spending time with loved ones, are very low on the list.

Three types of work addicts

  • The efficiency obsessive. They are hyper-organised and obsessed with detail. They are the master of inbox zero. However, they have lost sight of the big picture and don't know how to distinguish between efficiency and effectiveness.
  • The selfish productive. They are obsessed with their own goals, and if they are asked to collaborate, they aren't interested. They do have the big picture in mind, but they remain the biggest focus.
  • The quantity obsessed. They mistakenly equate productivity with output. They think the more tasks they do, the higher their performance. They are more prone to fall prey to burnout.

Workaholics acknowledge their unsustainable way of working

High performers who are extremely productive describe their work style as unsustainable. They acknowledge that they need help getting back on track.

There will come a point when performance suffers, and the effects become potentially life-threatening. It is essential to address the warning signs - such as rushing through a family meal to return to work - and to take steps to modify habits.

Overcoming extreme productivity addiction

  • Limit the amount of time spent on an individual task to 45 minutes. To create higher quality output, don't allow interruptions.
  • Create a 'not-to-do list' to avoid over-scheduling.
  • Take five minutes at least five times a day to stop completely. Go for a walk outside.
  • Make room for fun, laughter, and meaningful relationships. At the end of peoples' lives, they don't wish they worked longer hours. They wish they'd spent more time with family or traveled more.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Productivity is a way of living

It’s about achieving maximum output, getting shit done, and not wasting time. Tools, apps, or hacks, don’t work if you lack the right mindset.

Say no

...to things that don't thrill you. When you think ‘meh’ about something, always say NO. That eliminates wasting time on shit that you're not excited about.

Willpower is overrated

If something distracts you, eliminate it. Don’t think you’re immune to your distractions. Remove them.

5 more ideas

Workaholism

A Workaholic is a person who is addicted to work, having an uncontrollable and obsessive desire to work incessantly.

Workaholism is assumed to be the same as working hard, but the two quali...

How being a Workaholic harms you

When work occupies all your time and energy, and there is a relentless need to keep working at any cost, it can have some serious side effects.

1. Sleep Troubles

2. Frequent headaches and tiredness

3. Eating disorders and upset stomach

4. Pain in the body

5. Changes in Mood

6. Burnout

Workaholics have Sleep Troubles

Work addicts experience sleep trouble, with their busy schedules, without realizing that sleep actually benefits productivity.

This sleep deprivation also leads to crankiness and memory impairment.

5 more ideas

Productivity Obsession
Productivity Obsession

As workers, we are obsessed with getting stuff done. It is then clear why there seems to be a bottomless well full of advice, hacks, tools, tricks, and secrets to help us pack more into the waking ...

Modern History of Productivity
  • Adam Smith wrote in 1776 that there are two kinds of labor: productive and unproductive. The productive one generally adds value to the materials which he works upon, of his own maintenance, and his master's profit. However, a man grows poor by maintaining a multitude of menial servants who add to the value of nothing.
  • Benjamin Franklin put forth his own "to-do" list in 1791, stating that one should start the day asking what good shall be done and end the day evaluating what was accomplished.
Abuse Masked as Productivity

In the late 18th and early 19th century, during the Industrial Revolution, machines moved production from handmade in the home to factories. A frenzy of producing more goods more quickly became a kind of national pastime.

Low-wage factory workers, many of whom were children, toiled in unsafe conditions for decades before labor unions put measures in place to protect workers from the excesses of the push for productivity.

4 more ideas

"Don’t break the chain"

This is a productivity and motivation technique used and popularised by Jerry Seinfeld.

Each day you complete your task, you put an X in your calendar. Just keep at it and the ch...

Momentum vs Friction

Not breaking the chain leads to momentum, the force that allows something to grow stronger or faster as time passes. But like everything else, momentum has an equal and opposite reaction.

Friction is the resistance caused when one object is moving at a different rate than another. Friction the enemy of momentum, the force that breaks the chain.

The compound effect

Sustained momentum toward a singular goal creates a compound effect. 

This means that consistent, incremental changes can result in fundamental changes over time.

3 more ideas

Stop Reacting

Don’t check your email or anything else that is going to dictate your behavior.

If you start your day by checking and replying to emails, it means you'll just react as new things come ...

The Things That Matter Most

Most of us get 80% of results from 20% of the work we do. So focus on that 20%.

Don’t be vague. Specify what you need to get done - research shows that having concrete goals is correlated with huge increases in confidence and feelings of control.

Use Your “Magic Hours” Wisely

You have 2-2.5 hours of peak productivity every day. You may actually be 30% more effective at that time. For most of us, this happens in the morning.

Those are the hours when you should be working on your main goals. Why would you want to waste that on a conference call or a staff meeting?

2 more ideas

Effectiveness Vs Efficiency
  • Effectiveness is goal orientation. It's picking something to do. This is doing the right things—picking a goal and doing that goal.
  • Efficiency is doing things in an economica...
Scott Hanselman
Scott Hanselman

"Effectiveness is doing the right things, but efficiency is doing things right. That means effectiveness is picking a direction and efficiency is running really fast in that direction."

Scott Hanselman
Scott Hanselman

"Hope is not a plan. Hope is nothing but waiting and letting life happen to you."

6 more ideas

GTD (Getting Things Done)

GTD is a productivity method for organizing your to-dos, priorities, and schedule in a way that makes them all manageable.

Its 5 principles are:

  • Capture
  • Clarify
  • Org...

"GTD is an organizational system. It doesn't put rules around how you actually do your work. Instead, it focuses on how you capture the work you need to do, organize it, and choose what needs your attention"

"GTD is an organizational system. It doesn't put rules around how you actually do your work. Instead, it focuses on how you capture the work you need to do, organize it, and choose what needs your attention"

GTD: Capture
Capture everything. Your to-dos, your ideas, your recurring tasks, everything. Put it in a pen-and-paper notebook, a to-do app, a planner, whatever you prefer to use to get organized.

5 more ideas

Working From Home

Working from home means that all the chaos of your home (pets, family members, kids, and kitchen noises) is part of your entire workday.

Self-Discipline, concentration and work ethic are need...

Working is From Anywhere

WFH (Work From Home) eventually means you are working from coffee shops, parking lots, from your car while driving, and almost anywhere you can log in to your laptop or communicate on your phone.

No one knows where you are and what you are doing, and that can be an advantage, but also can be misused. 

Start Early and Mimic Office Time

The schedule that makes you start early, and mimic the office hours works best, as you end up being free earlier too. However, night owls may find working at night to be more productive or comfortable for them.

Maintaining a schedule in a routine, while incorporating regular exercise with it, works best.

5 more ideas

Writing The List In The Morning

Although it might feel natural to create your to-do list first thing in the morning, it's too late.
Writing the list at the end of the day allows you to leave work behind and tra...

Including Too Many Tasks

Ideally, create a ‘top three’ tasks at the beginning of your to-do list. 

Long lists are a problem because most people aren’t aware that “we only have about three to six good hours of work in us each day.”

People also tend to underestimate how long a task takes. 

Including Someday Items

Aspirational tasks, like writing a book, don’t belong on a to-do list; instead, create a separate bucket list. 

Daily to-do lists should be focused. If you have a big project you want to complete, you can put it on your to-do list if you chunk it out into smaller, more attainable tasks.

4 more ideas

There are no productivity hacks
There are no productivity hacks

Habits and work systems can produce the best return on your time.

Getting more work done is about knowing what to do, when to do it, and how to get it done in order to maxi...

Unimportant tasks are really just distractions

Urgent but unimportant tasks = distractions.

Urgent tasks put us into constant “reply mode.” Important work is related to planned tasks that move us closer to our goals.

Interruptions break your flow

Anytime you are pulled away from your tasks, it takes time to readjust to them when you jump back in (sometimes it can take up to 25 minutes).

Interruptions (notifications, loud noises, social media, checking email etc.) harm your concentration.

2 more ideas