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How To Spot The Signs Of Team Overwhelm (And What To Do About It)

An Overwhelmed Team

An Overwhelmed Team

While a manager expects and assumes the team to be top-notch in their work, completing projects like there is no tomorrow, the reality of workers is quite different. More than half of the workforce is overwhelmed and maxed-out, according to a survey.

A manager cannot pretend everything is hunky-dory and has to recognize the problem and provide solutions.

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How To Spot The Signs Of Team Overwhelm (And What To Do About It)

How To Spot The Signs Of Team Overwhelm (And What To Do About It)

https://blog.trello.com/spot-signs-of-team-overwhelm

blog.trello.com

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Key Ideas

An Overwhelmed Team

While a manager expects and assumes the team to be top-notch in their work, completing projects like there is no tomorrow, the reality of workers is quite different. More than half of the workforce is overwhelmed and maxed-out, according to a survey.

A manager cannot pretend everything is hunky-dory and has to recognize the problem and provide solutions.

Signs Of An Overwhelmed Team

  1. Dip in energy levels: It happens when the team is not enthusiastic and is only taking reactive actions and going through the motion, exposing the mental pressure they are in.
  2. Work quality is taking a dip: It happens if you see incomplete or sloppy work, along with decreased productivity.
  3. Frayed emotions: If workers are terse and curt with their colleagues in their personal interaction and written correspondence.
  4. Other unexpected irregularities: There may be some that move inside their mental ‘cave’ and others who become overtly extrovert.

Replan And Rebalance

If there are signs of team overwhelm, the manager needs to first see if the work can be shared with others, or if any deadline can be extended, providing some relief to the workers. A replanning of upcoming projects to lessen the intensity of upcoming work can also be worked on.

In many cases it is just a matter of giving the workers a day off to recoup.

Remove The Overwhelming Problem

  1. Restructure: A manager needs to reorganize the work using various productivity tools so that it is less overwhelming or stressful.
  2. Work-Life Balance: Encourage employees to take time off and get some balance in their lives by doing self-care.
  3. Vibe Check: Get to know how everyone is feeling by checking in on a regular basis.
  4. Open Door Policy: Make yourself genuinely open and approachable for a one-on-one conversation.

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Jealous of others' success

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Assign Peer Mentors

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