Peace, despite the noise in your mind - Deepstash

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How to Be Present and Peaceful When You Can't Stop Thinking

Peace, despite the noise in your mind

  • Understand it is impossible to silence your mind: It’s human to have thoughts. 
  • The more you fight your thoughts, the more you amplify them. Being non-judgmental is the key to stillness.
  • Whenever you analyze, you are always thinking into the past and future, not in the present moment.
  • Focus on what you are doing: This restrains your mind from wandering.
  • Return to focus whenever you wander away from it.

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How to Be Present and Peaceful When You Can't Stop Thinking

How to Be Present and Peaceful When You Can't Stop Thinking

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/how-to-be-present-peaceful-cant-stop-thinking/

tinybuddha.com

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Key Ideas

Increase focus and stay present:

  • Mentally remind yourself of your present action: Use self-talk to direct your focus back to the present moment.
  • Focus on your senses: Direct your attention back into your body and out of your head.
  • Do things differently: Make things more challenging. As a result, you are forced to act consciously instead of acting on autopilot.

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