Melancholia: A distinct pattern - Deepstash

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Why melancholia must be understood as distinct from depression

Melancholia: A distinct pattern

  • Melancholia shows a clear pattern of symptoms and signs.
  • Sufferers experience a gloominess and have no desire to socialize.
  • They also lack energy and have difficulty concentrating.
  • Episodes typically appear from nowhere.

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