You can decide to do something without ever getting excited about it - Deepstash

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How to Motivate Yourself to Do Things You Don't Want to Do

You can decide to do something without ever getting excited about it

You could choose to do something because it will:

  • Lower your anxiety.
  • Benefit someone who you care about.
  • Lead to financial gain.
  • Avoid a negative consequence.
  • Make you feel good about yourself.
  • Clear your mind.
  • Align with your values.
  • Reduce stress.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Motivate Yourself to Do Things You Don't Want to Do

How to Motivate Yourself to Do Things You Don't Want to Do

https://hbr.org/2018/12/how-to-motivate-yourself-to-do-things-you-dont-want-to-do

hbr.org

2

Key Ideas

When you have a low drive to move forward:

  • Put a low-frequency activity ahead of a high-frequency activity.
  • Give yourself a standard time and honor it: Block time for important activities.
  • Limit the time commitment: Work for 10 minutes a day on this task and then you can stop if you want to.
  • Set the bar low: Take just one action step a week on this activity.
  • Get ‘er done. If you want to get this entirely off your plate, set  aside a whole day to complete the task.

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Align your to-do list with goals
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