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Ancient Wisdom - 5 Rituals That Will Make You Happy

Accepting doesn't mean giving up

Stoicism is about accepting the facts as they are and then deciding what you’re going to do about them. Nobody recommends denial. Accept. And then do something

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There is a limit to happiness

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The Core Of Stoicism

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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy And Stoicism

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), is a “problem-focused” approach to psychological therapy and is seen as very effective against depression, anxiety and every kind of unhelpful thinking.

Like stoicism, CBT encourages distinguishing between events and perceptions, and most CBT textbooks contain one of the core teachings of the Stoics: our perception hurts us more than the things themselves.

The Problem With Stoicism

Practitioners may forget that some of the biggest determinants of our wellbeing are socio-economic and political if they follow too closely stoicism’s belief that circumstances can’t be changed and they must adapt. Doing so can needlessly perpetuate and aggravate harmful situations.

Seneca

“We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality.”

Seneca
Being afraid won't keep us safe

We misunderstand the value of fear when we think that being constantly hypervigilant will keep us safe.

Being afraid all the time doesn’t keep danger away from us. Instead, we need to learn to recognize key signals that could predict risk, in order to actually feel calmer and safer.

Picking up the real signals

When we walk around terrified all the time, we can’t pick out the signal from the noise.

If you’re constantly scared, you can’t correctly notice when there is something genuine to fear
. True fear is a momentary signal, not an ongoing state.