Doodle to remember

Doodle to remember

Drawing can be a more effective memory aid than writing and rewriting. You don't actually have to be good at drawing to reap the memory benefits. It is effective because it involves multiple ways of representing the same information: visual, spatial, verbal, semantic & motoric.

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Drawing to remember

Drawing something that you want to remember is more effective than using other memory techniques.

Since drawing involves consideration of a thing from so many different angles (visual, spatial, semantic, and verbal) and also involves motor use, the brain stores a memory in more areas of the brain, thus solidifying it.

To remember something, draw it

bigthink.com

Walking backwards

Backwards walking (whether real, imaginary, or virtual) can boost your short-term memory. 

To go back in time, it might help to go backwards in space. Moving backwards through space appears to carry the our minds backward along that subjective timeline toward the point at which the remembered information was encoded, thus improving our recall.

Five ways you could become a memory champion

bbc.com

Exercises For Posture Correction
  • Plank: Hold the initial push-up position, legs straight. Don’t allow your lower back to sink, and make sure you are looking down at the floor. 
  • Wall Angels: Lean back against the wall and lift your arms up and down (as if creating “snow angels”). Ensure your rear is touching the wall and your back is flat against the wall. 
  • Up Against the Wall: Put your hands behind your head, place your elbows to the wall and stretch. 
  • Text Neck: Bring your phone to you at eye level.

The Ultimate Exercises to Improve Posture (Simple and Effective)

lifehack.org

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