Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything - Deepstash

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Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything

https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-find-a-simple-trick-to-help-you-remember-pretty-much-anything

sciencealert.com

Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything
If you need to remember something, you might do well to... draw it. According to a new study, drawing can be a more effective memory aid than writing and rewriting, simply looking at information, or using various other visualisation techniques.

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Doodle to remember

Drawing can be a more effective memory aid than writing and rewriting. You don't actually have to be good at drawing to reap the memory benefits. It is effective because it involves multiple ways ...

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When we draw something we are forced to consider in more detail and it’s this deeper processing that makes us more likely to remember it.

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Helpful tips for trying visual note-taking

  • Turn your paper 90 degrees so it’s longer than it is tall. 
  • Pair images with your own words.
  • Arrange them on the page in a way that makes sense to you
  • The images don’t have to be complicated or artsy. They don’t have to make sense to anybody else. They just have to be meaningful to you.