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Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything

Doodle to remember

Drawing can be a more effective memory aid than writing and rewriting. You don't actually have to be good at drawing to reap the memory benefits. It is effective because it involves multiple ways of representing the same information: visual, spatial, verbal, semantic & motoric.

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Remember anything

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Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything

Scientists Find a Simple Trick For Remembering Pretty Much Anything

https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-find-a-simple-trick-to-help-you-remember-pretty-much-anything

sciencealert.com

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Key Idea

Doodle to remember

Drawing can be a more effective memory aid than writing and rewriting. You don't actually have to be good at drawing to reap the memory benefits. It is effective because it involves multiple ways of representing the same information: visual, spatial, verbal, semantic & motoric.

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Drawing to remember
Drawing to remember

Drawing something that you want to remember is more effective than using other memory techniques.

Since drawing involves consideration of a thing from so many different angles (visual,...

Drawing to improve mental decline

For older people with dementia or Alzheimer's, drawing stores memories in still-intact regions of the brain.

Drawing makes better use of brain regions that are still preserved, and could help people experiencing cognitive impairment with memory function.

Walking backwards

Backwards walking (whether real, imaginary, or virtual) can boost your short-term memory. 

To go back in time, it might help to go backwards in space. Moving backwards t...

Drawing to remember

When we draw something we are forced to consider in more detail and it’s this deeper processing that makes us more likely to remember it.

Even writing a list helps somehow, which is why when you get to the shop and realise you’ve left your shopping list at home, you can still remember more items than if you hadn’t written a list at all. However, doing a drawing takes it one step further.
Exercise, but get the timing right

When you want to learn something in particular, then physical effort does seem to help, at least in the short-term. 

In an experiment, people that did 35 minutes of interval training 4 hours after learning a list of pictures paired with locations were better at remembering the pairs than those who did the interval training straight away.

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Memorizing new material

When we try to memorize new information, we assume that the more work we put in, the better we will do.

But, our memory for new information is the most fragile just after it has first been en...

Take some downtime

Aiming for minimal interference - to do literally nothing - is the best way to consolidate the facts and remember it better.

Research found that short periods of rest increased the ability to recall information up to 30 % in healthy individuals. For people with neurological injury, such as a stroke, the ability to recall after some rest, places them almost within the range of healthy people.

We remember better after rest

When memories are initially encoded, they pass through a period of consolidation that cements them in long-term storage.

It was once thought to happen mostly during sleep; studies have found that it is not limited to sleep, because it happens during periods of wakeful rest, too.