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Why It's Easier to Make Decisions for Someone Else

Cautious mindset vs. an adventurous mindset

  • When choosing for ourselves, we focus more on a granular level, something we describe as a cautious mindset.
  • When it came to deciding for others, we look more at the array of options and focus on their overall impression. We are bolder when we're operating from an adventurous mindset.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why It's Easier to Make Decisions for Someone Else

Why It's Easier to Make Decisions for Someone Else

https://hbr.org/2018/11/why-its-easier-to-make-decisions-for-someone-else

hbr.org

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Key Ideas

A different mindset when choosing for others

We adopt an adventurous mindset that stands in contrast to the more cautious mindset that rears when people make their own choices.

We see the best solution with clarity and a decisiveness that is often absent when we face our own dilemmas.

Cautious mindset vs. an adventurous mindset

  • When choosing for ourselves, we focus more on a granular level, something we describe as a cautious mindset.
  • When it came to deciding for others, we look more at the array of options and focus on their overall impression. We are bolder when we're operating from an adventurous mindset.

Taking an outside perspective

We should work to distance ourselves from our own problems by adopting a fly-on-the-wall perspective and act as our own advisors.

Another distancing technique is to pretend that our decision is someone else's and visualize it from his or her perspective. By imagining how someone else would tackle your problem, people may unwittingly help themselves.

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