A quick mindfulness exercise to start accepting your emotions - Deepstash

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Work WITH your emotions rather than suppressing them

A quick mindfulness exercise to start accepting your emotions

  • Visualise a time you felt excitement.
  • Think of a time you felt anger.
  • Picture a time you felt love.
  • Think of a time you felt sadness.
  • Visualise a time you felt proud.
  • Think of a time you felt fear.
  • Picture a time you felt happy.

This exercise takes you through many emotions. Then ask yourself to recognise where you feel each emotion. End with an affirmation which focuses on accepting them. Recognise where you feel those emotions as it can give you insight into the emotion arising so you can manage it before it becomes overwhelming.

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