Achieving a Blended Leadership Style - Deepstash

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How to Develop Your Leadership Style

Achieving a Blended Leadership Style

  • Know yourself: Ask yourself, "where do you fall on the leadership style spectrum?" If you are unsure where you fall under, keep track of your actions and behavior during various interactions.
  • Experiment with various styles: When you begin to have an understanding of where you fall in the spectrum, constantly practice new behaviors to make it feel more familiar and less awkward.
  • Read the room: Assess their behaviors and actions before deciding on an approach.

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