Understanding importance over urgency - Deepstash

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How to Prioritize When There's Always More To Do

Understanding importance over urgency

Understanding importance over urgency

The Eisenhower Matrix system forces us to prioritize important tasks over urgent tasks.

Put your tasks in one of four separate categories:

  • Urgent and Important tasks/projects to be completed immediately.
  • Not Urgent & Important tasks/projects to be scheduled on your calendar.
  • Urgent & Unimportant tasks/projects to be delegated to someone else.
  • Not Urgent & Unimportant tasks/projects to be deleted.

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Eisenhower Matrix

The matrix is a simple four-quadrant box that answers that helps you separate “urgent” tasks from “important” ones:

  • Urgent and Important: Do these tasks as soon as possible
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  • Urgent, but not important: Delegate these tasks to someone else
  • Neither urgent nor important: Drop these from your schedule as soon as possible.
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