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Half Life: The Decay of Knowledge and What to Do About It

Half life of facts and compound knowledge

If we want our knowledge to compound, we’ll need to focus on the invariant general principles.

Half-lives show us that if we spend time learning something that changes quickly, we might be wasting our time. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Half Life: The Decay of Knowledge and What to Do About It

Half Life: The Decay of Knowledge and What to Do About It

https://fs.blog/2018/03/half-life/

fs.blog

2

Key Ideas

The Half-Life of Facts

Facts decay over time. And the time it takes to disprove or replace half of it can be predicted.

Data in medicine become half as relevant in 2-3 years. For exact sciences, 2-4 years.

Half life of facts and compound knowledge

If we want our knowledge to compound, we’ll need to focus on the invariant general principles.

Half-lives show us that if we spend time learning something that changes quickly, we might be wasting our time. 

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Why we experience the curse of knowledge

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