Feeling stuck indoors

Feeling stuck indoors

Cabin fever can be described as a feeling of restlessness and irritability when we are stuck indoors.

Confinement can frustrate what psychologists consider to be our three basic psychological needs:

  • Autonomy (choosing what we do)
  • Competence (feeling like we're achieving our aims
  • Relatedness (feeling connected to others)
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Health

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

  • Try to structure your day so that you have some feelings of control.
  • Consider using the time to learn new skills.
  • Stay in touch with friends and family.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Respect the privacy and space of those you live with.
  • Get some fresh air.

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