We Can’t Bounce Back From Everything - Deepstash

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Why Imagination—Not Resilience—Might Help You Heal From Heartbreak - Mindful

We Can’t Bounce Back From Everything

We Can’t Bounce Back From Everything

Resilience is becoming a buzzword, a mainstay of many books telling us to recover and grow from difficulties. This substitute word for mental toughness may not be enough to adjust or recoup from misfortune, heartbreak, or a tragedy.

Pure resilience, it seems, is hard to cultivate and may be difficult to maintain even for people who use mindfulness to become mentally tough and strong. It is an ineffective coping device for people who believe they are weak.

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Resilience

It's the skill that enables us to recover quickly from difficulties. It means adapting well in the face of trauma, tragedy or significant stress.

We build our resilience by learni...

Build a circle of trust

The primary factor in resilience is having supportive relationships, inside and outside the family. 

Close friends, family and loved ones represent our social support; they encourage and motivate us, and let us know that we aren’t alone.

Reframe stressful situations

The way we view a potentially stressful situation can either make the crisis worse in our mind or minimize it. 

Reframing things in a more positive way can alter our perceptions and relieve our stressful feelings.

Be Emotionally Self-Aware

Strong emotions are more likely to dictate your behavior.

Become familiar with what triggers your stress. Practice “active internal coping mechanisms” such as reframing, humor, optimis...

Write It Out

Simply writing about your feelings can help you explore them and resolve some of the issues that may be preventing you from recovering from trauma.

Build A Community

Fostering strong relationships with family, friends, mentors and others to whom you can turn in times of crisis helps you bounce back. 

The journey through suffering

The five stages of grief are described as anger, bargaining, denial, depression, and acceptance. Yet, when a tragedy strike, we already know how bad things are. What is most needed is hope.

Suffering as part of life

We live in an age where many feel that they are entitled to a perfect life. But at some stage, everyone will face a tragedy.

When tough times do come, resilient people seem to recognize that suffering is part of every human life. Understanding this stops you from feeling discriminated against when trouble comes.

Directing your attention

Resilient people typically manage to focus on the things they can change and accept the things they can't.

Don't get swallowed up by your troubles. Don't lose what you still have to what you have lost.