Making difficult decisions: things to consider - Deepstash

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Advice from an ex-Marine officer on making tough decisions

Making difficult decisions: things to consider

  • Consider what makes this decision so hard for you, then deal with it and learn from it.
  • Know the environment and influencing factors in which the decision is being made. Try to understand the urgency, circumstances, culture, and expectations of those involved. All of these will ultimately influence your decision.
  • You're not in this by yourself. Become familiar with the capabilities and resources available. Knowing other leaders to reach out to can make a big difference.
  • Understand the impact, both individually and organizationally. Putting yourself in the shoes of the affected party will better reveal the effect of a particular decision.

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