The Benefits Of Laziness - Deepstash

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The benefits of laziness: why being a lazy person can be good for you

The Benefits Of Laziness

  1. Many smart solutions like the remote control, smart speakers, escalators and even the light switch are the work of lazy people.
  2. Lazy people often actively procrastinate, and unlike the ‘passive’ procrastinators, they have better control over their work and time and perform well under pressure.
  3. As lazy people see their energy as an expenditure that can be saved like time or money, they avoid unnecessary, low-output tasks, and prefer high-leverage tasks.
  4. Lazy people are the pioneers of automating, delegating or eliminating monotonous and time-consuming tasks.

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Memory bias
Memory bias

A memory bias distorts the content of your memory.

Our memories are reconstructed during recall. The process of recall makes them prone to manipulation and errors.

The many faces of the memory bias
  • Rosy retrospection bias. We often remember the past as having been better than it really was.
  • Consistency bias. We wrongly remember our past attitudes and behaviour as similar to our present attitudes and behaviour.
  • Mood-congruent memory bias. We better remember memories that are consistent with our current mood.
  • Hindsight or knew-it-all-along bias. We consider past events as being predictable.
  • Egocentric bias. We recall past events in a self-serving manner. We remember a caught fish as bigger than it was.
  • Availability bias. We think the memories that come easily to mind is more representative than it really is.
  • Recency effect. We best remember the most recent information.
  • Choice-supportive bias. We remember chosen options as better than rejected options.
  • Fading effect bias. Our emotions associated with negative memories fade faster than our feelings associated with pleasant memories.
  • Confirmation bias. We tend to interpret memories in a way that confirms our prior hypotheses of personal beliefs.
The benefits of our faulty memory

The limits of our memory serve us well in many respects.

  • Limited memories are useful trade-off to allow us to function and survive. We have thousands of memories, for example, of tables. If we recall all the events related to a table, it will create mass confusion with data overload.
  • Flawed memories may also help us to cope with our past and navigate our future. It may give us more confidence in our past decisions or make us remember happier events.
The Curse Of Knowledge
The Curse Of Knowledge

The Curse Of Knowledge is common among many experts, teachers and professionals, and is a cognitive bias where the knowledgeable person incorrectly assumes that others are able to decipher ...

Avoiding The Curse Of Knowledge

The negative effects of the curse of knowledge can be avoided by:

  1. Questioning your assumptions and biases, and seeking alternatives to your beliefs for a broader perspective.
  2. Knowing your audience or prospect, accessing their level of knowledge.
  3. Asking honest feedback for your creations.
  4. Including infographics and visuals and minimizing jargon.
The Feynman Technique

The Feynman Technique is a way to understand or reinforce your level of knowledge by pretending to explain the same to a child.

Explaining without the use of complicated words is a way to learn and retain knowledge that lasts.

Efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency
Efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency

These terms sound very similar and are often used interchangeably in everyday conversations.

  • Efficacy means getting stuff done. (Related question: Is it working?...
Efficacy: Getting stuff done

Efficacy is mostly used in a scientific setting. Efficacy is the ability to create an anticipated effect.

For example, a specific medication that improves a patient's symptoms in an ideal environment has demonstrated efficacy.

Effectiveness: Doing the right things

Efficacy is not always enough. Medication that improves a patient's symptoms under ideal conditions is technically getting things done, but not always the right things.

Effectiveness in clinical trials is about how well a treatment works in the real world, not just in perfectly controlled conditions.