Overcoming an unhealthy behavior - Deepstash

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Why Am I So Obsessed with Giving People Gifts?

Overcoming an unhealthy behavior

It is useful to map out the habit loop.

  • The trigger: what thoughts or feelings are driving your behaviour?
  • The behaviour: What action do you take when you experience that trigger?
  • The result: What is the feeling you get after completing that action?

People often think that a behaviour feels good, but when they pay attention while acting out that behaviour, they notice that it actually doesn't. After they notice unhelpful behaviours, it is important to replace the habit with something uplifting.

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Our Partner’s Gift-Giving Language

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