Keeping Your Composure At Work - Deepstash

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How to Deal With Someone Who Keeps Undermining You at Work

Keeping Your Composure At Work

Keeping Your Composure At Work

It's inevitable running into negative nancy at work or those who choose to undermine your capabilities. However, you get to decide how to handle people like them. You can either fight them or let them talk and not be bothered by what they say.

Every situation can be handled with grace as long as you let yourself do so. Take a deep breath and remember that what people say about you is ultimately a reflection of them and not you.

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Disengaged Employees

Engagement at work is a sign of employee motivation and resulting productivity. Unfortunately, only about 13% of people globally are engaged at work, and disengaged employees cost the economy $5...

What Not To Do
  • Do not make assumptions about a disengaged employee's performance. While statistically, such employees do underperform, there can be other reasons too.
  • Do not force an employee to be someone they are not. Everyone cannot be happy and optimistic all the time.
  • Do not get emotional, and stick to a transactional, formal, work-focused style. Do not expect to win their hearts or influence them by appealing to their emotions.
  • Do not assign employees tasks beyond their area of expertise.
Approaching Disengaged Employees
  • Use extrinsic motivating factors such as incentives and rewards to get productivity from a disengaged employee.
  • Understand what drives them, connect with them, gaining their trust and respect without being emotional, and focus on what they value.
  • Respect an employee's personal space and their need to distance their problems from their work.

Ultimately, it is what an employee delivers that matters most, and a manager has to focus on figuring out how to get the work done.

Reskilling And Refitting
Reskilling And Refitting
  • Due to the pandemic, millions have had to say goodbye to their existing jobs, as companies and stores make positions redundant or go bankrupt themselves.
  • Training oneself or upgrad...
The Problem With Reskilling
  • Globalisation and technological progress have impacted the well-paid ‘blue-collar’ jobs negatively, apart from disrupting routine office work. Addressing a skills gap by training workers sounds great in theory, but various studies point out to a different reality: skilled workers are already in oversupply.
  • The problem arises from the retraining occupations that workers are doing, which may not be what the industry requires, but just a small fraction of the total vacancies. Add to this the fact that technology itself is automating tasks at a brisk pace, eliminating thousands of jobs altogether.
Realism About Reskilling

The push towards reskilling is not a scam, but merely a misalignment of incentives and a myopic focus on ‘skilling’, which does not shine a light on the numerous other factors that prevent people from getting new jobs, or keep them stuck in dead-end jobs:

  1. Lack of interoperability between organisations for employer health or retirement plans.
  2. Lack of decent-paying entry-level jobs.
  3. Logistical and commuting issues of the employee.
  4. Lack of guidance and support to laid-off employees from the industry.
Recognize the signs
  • You're tired all the time. 
  • Cooperating with colleagues takes an enormous effort. 
  • You keep your office door shut and interact with your computer. 
  • ...
Take a mental health break

It's hard when you can't function as well as you're used to, but slogging on doesn't work when you're in a downward spiral. 

When you're at a crossroads in terms of your mental health, you need to really say, 'OK, I'm going to ask for five days off. That might mean the difference between me not having a mental health breakdown, or needing to take additional time off.

Find treatment
"Depression is no different from any other chronic condition," says Paul Gionfriddo, president and CEO of Mental Health America. 

"To stay with it and maintain an independent and productive life -- it's important to identify it, get the appropriate treatment and then stick with that treatment."