Popcorn: The Entry Into Movie Theatres - Deepstash

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Why Do We Eat Popcorn at the Movies?

Popcorn: The Entry Into Movie Theatres

  • When movie theatres started showing movies with sound, the audience increased, as now people didn’t have to read the titles from the movies.
  • Popcorn by then was a cheap snack outside of theatres, with a bag costing only about 5 to 10 cents.
  • Moviegoers started buying them before entering the theatres, forcing the owners to halt this practice and restrict the entry of the snack in the theatre.
  • Eventually, the theatre owners realized they could sell popcorn inside the theatres and earn huge profits.
  • Many theatres were saved from going bankrupt solely on the ability to sell the crunchy snacks along with movie tickets.
  • By 1945, 50% of all popcorn that was consumed in the United States was eaten at the movie halls. The owners even used jingles and commercials to entice audiences to ‘go to the lobby’ during the movie interval.

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