Replacing meat with peanut butter - Deepstash

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A Brief History of Peanut Butter

Replacing meat with peanut butter

A 1908 ad claimed that 10 cent's worth of peanuts contained six times the energy of a porterhouse steak.

By World War I, U.S. meat rationing turned consumers to peanuts. Manufacturers sold tubs of peanut butter to local grocers and advised them to stir frequently as the oil would separate and spoil.

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