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4 Strategies To Master The Art Of Delegation

Delegating = letting go

Delegating, or “the art of letting go”, can be one of the hardest things to grasp for a founder who enjoys having their hands in so many projects at once.

While maintaining a daily role in the company is vital, it’s just as critical to make sure you’re not overworking. 

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4 Strategies To Master The Art Of Delegation

4 Strategies To Master The Art Of Delegation

https://www.fastcompany.com/3045434/4-strategies-to-master-the-art-of-delegation

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Delegating = letting go

Delegating, or “the art of letting go”, can be one of the hardest things to grasp for a founder who enjoys having their hands in so many projects at once.

While maintaining a daily role in the company is vital, it’s just as critical to make sure you’re not overworking. 

The art of delegation

  • Clearly define roles and responsibilities, to allow things to flow smoothly.
  • Emphasize accountability: each person has to understand exactly what they’re accountable for in order to grow in a way that benefits both themselves and the company.
  • Democratize decision-making: you don't have to be in every decision-making process.
  • Paint the big picture: understand how even the most (seemingly) menial tasks fit into the overall vision you’ve established.

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