Brain-to-brain coupling - Deepstash

Brain-to-brain coupling

People whose conversations with others are full of awkward silences might have neural patterns that are out of sync.

There might be a way to increase your chances of clicking. Maybe clicking can be triggered by consciously matching someone's posture, vocal rhythm, facial expressions, and even eyeblinks.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Why You Click with Certain People

When you click with someone

When you click with someone, everything the other person says rings true. Your speech rhythms match and conversation flow without a single awkward silence.

If you feel like you're "on the same wavelength" with someone, there's a good reason for that. Neuroscientists call it interpersonal synchronization.

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We resonate with some people more than others.

  • Neural synchrony occurs between couples. One study showed that merely being in each other's presence caused their brain waves to sync, particularly in wavelengths called the alpha-mu band.
  • Neural synchrony occurs in mundane situations. One study showed that the brain activity of volunteers viewing clips was exceptionally similar among friends. But the similarity decreases between friends of friends, or friends twice removed, and so forth.

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Neural homophily - where like befriends like - as measured by brain activity, underpins the phenomenon of clicking. It's why you and that stranger can laugh at the same things, or see the logic in the same argument.

But homophily also describes how the same things like age, ethnicity, and education level can draw people together, meaning that the traits made people friends, and the neural activity was secondary.

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RELATED IDEA

Social Bonding: The Process Leading To Help Others.

With nativism and conflicts between religious, ethnic, and racial groups on the rise globally, the results suggest that social integration, rather than segregation, may boost cooperation among humans.

“Priming a common group membership may be a more powerful driver for inducing prosocial motivation than increasing empathy,” said study lead author Inbal Ben-Ami Bartal, an assistant professor of psychobiology at Tel-Aviv University in Israel.

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Moving Together In Sync
  • The synchronicity that is created while moving together in a simultaneous and coordinated manner results in strong social bonding, and well-being, according to new research.
  • Activities like the parading, line dancing and crew rowing, which usually have synchronous movements, allows humans to bond together all at once.
  • Even in the animal kingdom, birds, dolphins, and fireflies synchronize their actions, displaying coordinated behaviour.

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Love sets the stage

When a loving mother holds the newborn baby in her arms for the first time, she intuitively knows to care for the child. A relationship is formed, a bond created. The child will emerge in abilities, babbling, creating imaginary scenarios, the capacity to collaborate, feel pain, understand emotions, discuss differing positions, argue convictions, until the child grows up and can meet the mother in an adult relationship of empathy, intimacy, and perspective-taking.

The mother-infant dance will shape the child's affiliative bonds throughout life.

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