Building effective teams - Deepstash

Building effective teams

It means figuring out how to assemble the right mix of people and expertise to deliver the most efficient and effective outcome.

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MORE IDEAS FROM 3 Ingredients for Building Effective Teams

Look at the workflow and resources available to help you understand the scope of the project and what support the team will need to be successful.

Important questions to keep in mind: Is your organization prepared to support the team in its objectives? Will they have the right tools and resources to complete their tasks? How will you measure their efficiency during the process and monitor it for improvement? 

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Defined roles

Roles might shift somewhat once the team is assembled, but an understanding of the skill sets and thinking styles is important for the team.

For example, the explorer will be more of a big-picture thinker who can help the team see what is possible and the number-cruncher will take charge of measurement and metrics, etc. 

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Start at the endpoint: What is the outcome you want and why? Leave the team some flexibility to develop the best way to get there.

Without a clear sense of what the team needs to accomplish and how a successful outcome will be defined, it's impossible to assemble the right group of people to get there.

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Identifying problems

Optimists tend to avoid difficult conversations and this could lead them to miss the opportunity of addressing critical issues. 

Pessimists inherently look for the problems more than the solutions. Pessimists are the ones who will see a problem and won't hesitate to share it with you and your team.

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Innovation in business

The idea of innovation is taking off just as fast as the businesses that embrace it.

But, not all companies are prepared to push innovation within their organizations. Changing workplace systems and procedures requires resilience and flexibility, and it’s an unfortunate reality that many people are afraid of or continue to resist change.

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The concept of servant leadership
The actual term for a leader who upends the power pyramid to put others' needs first was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in his influential 1970 essay "The Servant As Leader" in 1970.

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