The Myth: Mercury Retrograde - Deepstash

The Myth: Mercury Retrograde

Scientific calculations show that the gravitational effect of Mercury is negligible, the backward moving effect of Mercury during the retrograde phase is simply an illusion, a trick of perspective.

Modern science, therefore, concludes that the hoopla of Mercury retrograde is just confirmation bias, and the problems, snags and delays continue throughout the year, not just when the planet shifts to back gear.

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MORE IDEAS FROM What is Mercury in Retrograde, and Why Do We Blame Things On It?

Mercury Retrograde

Astronomy is at loggerheads with astrology when it comes to Mercury Retrograde, in which Mercury, the planet associated with communication, appears to move backwards and seemingly causes chaos, tension, missed flights, crashed computers and lost phones!

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  • Astrology is an ancient science first documented in Hindu cultures, along with Chinese and Maya civilizations.
  • Astrology articles dating back to the mid-18th century note that farmers would sync the planting schedule based on the planetary configurations.
  • During the Victorian era, interest in astrology boomed, and many astrologers connected Mercury Retrograde with heavy rainfall, ill omens and minor inconveniences.
  • By 1970, horoscopes became mainstream, with newspaper articles giving full attention to the planetary phenomenon that is apparently affecting our lives.

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RELATED IDEA

Uranus

The seventh planet from the Sun with the third largest diameter in our solar system, Uranus is very cold and windy. The ice giant is surrounded by 13 faint rings and 27 small moons as it rotates at a nearly 90-degree angle from the plane of its orbit. This unique tilt makes Uranus appear to spin on its side, orbiting the Sun like a rolling ball.

The first planet found with the aid of a telescope, Uranus was discovered in 1781 by astronomer William Herschel, although he originally thought it was either a comet or a star. It was two years later that the object was universally accepted as a new planet, in part because of observations by astronomer Johann Elert Bode.

William Herschel tried unsuccessfully to name his discovery Georgium Sidus after King George III. Instead the planet was named for Uranus, the Greek god of the sky, as suggested by Johann Bode.

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What Kind Of Planet is Earth? Types Of Planets.

Planets in the Solar System are divided into two main types: smaller rocky terrestrial, and large low-density giant planets.

A terrestrial planet

A terrestrial planet, telluric planet, or rocky planet is a planet that is composed primarily of silicate rocks or metals. Within the Solar System, the terrestrial planets accepted by the IAU are the inner planets closest to the Sun, i.e. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars.

A gas giant :

A gas giant is a giant planet composed mainly of hydrogen and helium. Gas giants are sometimes known as failed stars because they contain the same basic elements as a star.

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