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How to create a budget

  1. Gather Some Financial Information: gather a detailed list of your income and expenses.
  2. Select a Budgeting Method: figure out how you’ll budget your money to meet your most pressing financial goals.
  3. Create Your Budget: tally up all your expenses and income to see where you stand and allocate expenses.
  4. Execute Your Plan: you can use a notebook, pen and paper, a spreadsheet or an online software.
  5. Reward Yourself: you can work a small percentage into your budget to treat yourself each month.

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Budgeting is simply balancing your expenses with your income.

It's a plan for the coordination of resources and expenditures. When you budget your money, there’s a desired outcome. And being able to track your spending should ultimately move you in the right direction towards meeting your financial goals.

The 70:20:10 budgeting method

This method suggests that you allocate 70 percent of your income to expenses, 20 percent to savings, and the remaining 10 percent to debt.

70:20:10 may work for someone with a healthy emergency fund and minimal debt.

The 50:30:20 budgeting method

Under this method, 50 percent goes to expenses, 30 percent goes to wants, and 20 percent goes to a combination of debt and savings.

A person with a healthy amount of disposable income but loads of debt could probably benefit more from the 50:30:20 method.

The most common buckets are:

  • Expenses, or your needs: housing, food, transportation, clothing, insurance, childcare,  etc.
  • Debt - monthly debt obligations: personal loan, student loan, auto loan, and credit card payments etc.
  • Savings, including funds for your emergency fund.
  • Consider automating your retirement contributions to ensure you stick to the plan.
  • Wants: don't deprive yourself.
Online Scheduling and Online Bill Payment

Scheduling your payments  (online or through your financial institution’s bill pay feature) decreases the likelihood of blowing your budget. 

Despite the fact that funds will be sitting into your account until the date they are due to be withdrawn, you’ll know the money is off limits for casual spending.

Benefits of automated savings
  • you don’t have to go through the trouble of making an additional transfer
  • it won’t be as tempting to spend money that’s sitting in a savings account that you don’t make regular transactions out of.

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The 50/30/20 Rule

It breaks down your budget categories into three broad segments:

  • 50%: Essential Expenses like housing, automobile expenses, groceries, insurance, utilities, etc.
  • 30%: Discretionary Expenses (Non-essential) like Dining out, entertainment, drinks, etc.
  • 20%: Financial Goals including mortgage, home, and educational savings.

If there is heavy credit-card debt, the financial goals should be 30% and non-essential spendings only 20%.

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Automated System for Fewer Worries

Since you now have an idea where your money goes and how much goes out of your account, it's good if you set up an automated system because you won't have to worry about your checking account not having any money in it when you direly need it.

As long as it works for you, then you're on the right track.

Budgets are necessary for running any business efficiently and effectively.

  • Budget Development Process. Assumptions related to projected sales, trends, cost trends, and the overall economic outlook is established for the upcoming period. The budget is then published and outlines the standards and procedures used to develop it. The master budget includes forecasts of cash inflows and outflows, budgeted financial statements, and an overall financing plan.
  • Static Vs. Flexible Budgets. A static budget remains unchanged over the life of the budget. A flexible budget has a relational value to certain variables, such as sales levels, production levels, or other economic factors.