Past is not a burden, but a learning... - Deepstash
<ul><li>Past is not a burden, ...
  • Past is not a burden, but a learning curve.
  • Mistakes are not be repeated but rectified.
  • We can only do that if we believe "whatever has to happen will happen, yet life must go on"
  • Everyone is living a life which some else wishes they could live.
  • Make most of it, “past is not a curse but a blessing” to make things right the next time.

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MORE IDEAS FROM past, a curse or blessing?

  • Past is a memory that is gone in time
  • But we only remember or our mind will only remind us of moments that brought us tremendous joy or terrible misery.
  • Some people take positives and find ways to improve themselves
  • Some others live through the same mistakes over and over again, thinking it's thier fate.
  • Whatever happened in our past was due to the decisions we made in situations we felt were favorable to us and by foreseeing a better future.

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RELATED IDEA

The Past Is Flexible

The past, and our understanding of it, is a reflection of our current state of mind.

The past, which is assumed to be static, is in fact constantly changing. Historical facts are looked at with new data, new experiences, and according to what new shape the collective human memory takes.

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Explaining Life Reviews

If you've heard the phrase "my life flashed before my eyes", it's pretty self-explanatory what life review means.

For over a century, life reviews were well reported but there aren't much studies about it. There are two theories as to why this happens:

  • The first theory is that life events may exist as a continuum in our minds, and may come to the forefront in extreme conditions of psychological and physiological stress;
  • The second is that our memories "unload" themselves when we're on the brink of death like cortical disinhibition, but usually serene and ordered, not chaotic.

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  • The Indirect “No."Say no without feeling uncomfortable by explaining the reasons why you can't.
  • The “Let me get back to you.”Buy yourself time to think if you could do it and come up of a way to say no.
  • The Conditional “Yes.”With this conditional yes, we force people to prioritize. It shows that you have other things on your plate.
  • The Direct “No.”When you have mastered saying no, you stop giving excuses and start to say no firmly. Practice makes perfect.

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