When budgeting comes in handy - Deepstash

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The Miracle Money Cure: Six Common Financial Problems a Budget Can Fix - The Simple Dollar

When budgeting comes in handy

  • You have no idea where your money is going.
  • You’re chronically overspending.
  • You’re not saving any money.
  • You struggle to afford the things you really want.
  • You have trouble keeping track of bills.
  • You often face cash flow problems.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Steps of the zero-sum budget
  1. Determine how much you make on any given month.
  2. List your bills: Once you determine how much money you'll make this month,  figure out how much money you need to spend next month.
  3. Compare and contrast:  Once you see your monthly income and your monthly bills on paper, a clear picture of how much money is left over emerges.
  4. Spend all of your money on paper: decide where that money will serve you best.
  5. Track your spending.
  6.  Make adjustments to get it right.
The zero-sum budget

Using this method forces you to “spend” every dollar that you make, by allocating all of your earnings into the different categories that your finances require.

It prevents waste and maximizes your income, with the ultimate goal of reaching zero at the end of each month.  

Budgeting = creating a plan to spend your money

Budgeting is simply balancing your expenses with your income.

It's a plan for the coordination of resources and expenditures. When you budget your money, there’s a desired outcome. And being able to track your spending should ultimately move you in the right direction towards meeting your financial goals.

How to create a budget
  1. Gather Some Financial Information: gather a detailed list of your income and expenses.
  2. Select a Budgeting Method: figure out how you’ll budget your money to meet your most pressing financial goals.
  3. Create Your Budget: tally up all your expenses and income to see where you stand and allocate expenses.
  4. Execute Your Plan: you can use a notebook, pen and paper, a spreadsheet or an online software.
  5. Reward Yourself: you can work a small percentage into your budget to treat yourself each month.
The 70:20:10 budgeting method

This method suggests that you allocate 70 percent of your income to expenses, 20 percent to savings, and the remaining 10 percent to debt.

70:20:10 may work for someone with a healthy emergency fund and minimal debt.

Making Your Budget Too Strict

Budget for the life you have. When you’re going through your budget and assigning spending categories, be realistic. 

Don’t tell yourself you’ll never buy a single discretionary item, because you’re setting yourself up for failure. Give yourself some breathing room.

Budgeting for a Life You Can’t Afford

This becomes a problem when you’re spending for a life you can’t afford. It puts pressure on your budget and encourages you to live in a paycheck to paycheck cycle.

Assess your financial situation, cut back on your expenses, prioritize your money goals, and then come up with a new spending plan.

Budgeting Without a Purpose

It’s hard to stick to a budget that doesn’t have a goal.

When there isn’t one, your budget becomes an afterthought rather than a spending plan to reach your financial goals.