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The Ultimate Bullet Journal Guide for Beginners and Beyond

Weeklies and Dailies

  • Weeklies have the exact function of monthlies, but only using a week at a time. You can plan out the next 7 days in detail, covering your schedule, appointments, deadlines, goals, and other information you want to add.
  • Dailies: You write down all the things you need to get done today, all the appointments you need to remember, and any notes you need to keep. You can add other information -  how much water you drank, what food you ate etc.

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The Ultimate Bullet Journal Guide for Beginners and Beyond

The Ultimate Bullet Journal Guide for Beginners and Beyond

https://littlecoffeefox.com/ultimate-bullet-journal-cheat-sheet/

littlecoffeefox.com

5

Key Ideas

Bullet journal...

...is a planner system devised by Ryder Carrol.

It is a blank journal that houses a combination of certain elements, that allow you to plan for the future, track the past, and keep your sanity in the present.

Supplies needed to get started with BuJo

You can start a bullet journal in pretty much any empty notebook that you have lying around. That’s all you need. A journal and a pen. 

However, it is much more likely to use a bullet journal every day when getting some joy from the materials you're using. That means that a nicer journal and some bright, funky pens are also a great way to get started and enjoy the process a bit more. 

Future Log

A page where you can write down any future appointments or dates for a month you haven’t set up yet

That way you can easily reference it to see if there’s a dentist appointment coming up or a deadline sneaking up on you.

The monthly spread

...is quite simply a place to keep your month at a glance

You just need the calendar or list or whatever you decide to use. Everything beyond that is gravy.

Weeklies and Dailies

  • Weeklies have the exact function of monthlies, but only using a week at a time. You can plan out the next 7 days in detail, covering your schedule, appointments, deadlines, goals, and other information you want to add.
  • Dailies: You write down all the things you need to get done today, all the appointments you need to remember, and any notes you need to keep. You can add other information -  how much water you drank, what food you ate etc.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Adjust Your Mindset

Your first notebook will be your learning notebook. Like any productivity method, it will take time to find a bullet journaling flow and structure that works for you. 

Any creative en...

The first steps

  1. Get a Journal and Writing Utensils
  2. Start an Index Page: The backbone of your BuJo system, like a table of contents in a book
  3. Create Logs - places where you can brain-dump tasks, projects, goals
  4. Pick Signifiers: Many people use bullets for lists of tasks, circles for events, and dashes for notes. 
  5. Document Items with Collections: Collections are running lists and anything you want to remember for later(like blog topics, books you want to read etc.)

The 3 common types of logs:
  • A future log helps you keep track of items that aren’t yet on your immediate radar.
  • Monthly logs include things like calendars and categorized goal lists for the next 30 days.
  • Daily logs may includes entries of to-dos, meetings, and reminders.

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The Bullet Journal (BuJo)

It lets you capture all your notes, to-do lists, calendars and sketches and organize them into a single system.

It uses a practice called “Rapid Logging,” which involves quickly jottin...

How to Bullet Journal
  • Grab a notebook and a pen;
  • Format your journal: Index page->Future Log-> Monthly Log-> Daily Log;
  • Flip to your Daily Log, and start writing. Keep your items as brief as possible. 
  • Categorize each entry into one of three groups: Tasks, Events or Notes;
  • Log future events and tasks: schedule events or tasks or that you would like to address at a later date;
  • Organize your Month: Use this page to schedule events or tasks throughout the month.
Adapting to context

Different types of information demand different styles of note-taking. There are lots of reasons to take notes: to retain information, to capture ideas, to problem solve or brainstorm, to visualize...

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way that is easy to review.

Cons: difficult to go back and edit information written in this system.

Works for: recording terms, definitions, facts and sequences, when taking notes on slides or readings.

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

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Bullet Journals
Bullet Journals

A Bullet Journal (BuJo) is a tool that can help you organize your life and improve your mental health. It is more beneficial than a checklist or a to-do list and a calendar. It is used to track any...

Tracking Everything You Do or Feel

Using a Bullet Journal as a productivity tracker helps you see what all you have done and what is being neglected. It tells you if what you are doing is healing to you or is counterproductive.

Manually making a mental health tracker, and filling it daily to check your anxiety, depression, sleep, energy levels or even pain can tell you if there are any trends in the symptoms.

Tracking Success and Improvements

Daily tracking of progress and improvements, noting down one or more successful activities, or any small thing done right every day, can boost your mental health. The idea is not to condemn yourself but to motivate you towards positive progress.

Rapid Logging
Rapid Logging

It is the language in which the Bullet Journal is written, a way of capturing information as bulleted lists. 

It's a way to enjoy the benefits of hand writing, while avoiding the ...

Bullets

Bullets are short-form sentences paired with symbols that visually categorize your entries into: Tasks, Events, or Notes. 

Tasks

They are represented by a simple dot “•”.

You use a dot instead of a checkbox because it's fast, clean, and can easily be transformed to reflect the state of the Task. 

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Note Taking - Starter Tips

Preparation steps before a note-taking session:

  • Try to get familiar with the topic that is going to be discussed, beforehand. This leads to better understanding.
  • M...
Outline Method

Taking a structured approach to note-taking is the best way. Put the outline notes by choosing four or five key points of the lecture, followed by in-depth sub-points. One way to review is to use the Cornell Method, which divides the note sheet into three sections:

  • Cues: It includes key questions and main points.
  • Notes: Which you write during the class using the outline method. 
  • Summary: Which you can write after class while reviewing.

The Mind Map

The mind map is a visual diagram of abstract concepts.

It works best in subjects like chemistry, history and philosophy, subjects having a neural network like interlocked and complex topics. 

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Habit tracking

Is a simple and effective thing to do if you want to stick with a habit for good. No matter the format (calendar, journal, app), it provides immediate evidence whether you are making progress or...

The power of habit tracking:
  1. It creates a visual cue that can remind you to act.
  2. It is motivating to see the progress you are making. You don't want to break your streak.
  3. It feels satisfying to record your success in the moment.
To make habit tracking easier:
  1. Manual tracking should be limited to your most important habits
  2. Record each measurement immediately after the habit occurs

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The Art of Note-Taking
The Art of Note-Taking

Even in an age where laptops rule, notetaking is still the tool of choice for highly successful students, entrepreneurs, and leaders.

Tim Ferris attributes his notetaking style as one o...

The Cornell Method

This simple and highly systematic note-taking method helps you to understand key ideas and relationships easily. Best used for:

  • Gathering information from a seminar or presentation.
  • Recording college lecture notes.
  • Studying literature or a textbook.
Cornell Method: How to take notes
  1. Write down the lecture name/seminar/reading topic at the top of the page.
  2. Write down notes in the largest section of the page (right-hand column). Transcribe only the facts using bulleted lists and abbreviations. Take notes of questions that arise.
    3. Create question cues in the left-hand column that you will use later as a study tool.
  3. At the bottom section of the page, summarize the main ideas of your notes. Ask yourself how you would explain this information to someone else. Keep it concise.

Read over your notes in the left-hand column and summary at the bottom as often as possible. Quiz yourself with the questions you've included in the left column. Repeat often to increase your recall and deepen your comprehension.

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Routines and structure

Having no routine or structure is so much more draining mentally, physically, and emotionally than any routine could ever be. 

You're depriving your body and mind of the energy an...

Brian Tracy
Brian Tracy

"Good habits are hard to form but easy to live with. Bad habits are easy to form but hard to live with." 

No e-mails in the morning

If you immediately check your email or social media accounts when you wake up in the morning, you’re starting your day off in reactive mode instead of proactive. It means spending the best part of the day on other people's priorities.

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You are the sum of your decisions

A few major decisions determine a good portion of how our lives, careers, and relationships turn out. The outcomes of these decision points will reverberate for years.

Even smal...

Why We Make Poor Decisions
  • We’re not as rational as we think. 
  • We’re not prepared. We don’t understand the invariant ideas — the mental models — of how the world really works. 
  • We don’t gather the information we need. We make decisions based on our “guts” in complex domains that require serious work to gather all the needed data. 
The World Is Multidisciplinary

We live in a society that demands specialization. Being the best means being an expert in something.  A byproduct of this niche focus is that it narrows the ways we think we can apply our knowledge without being called a fraud.

We should apply all the knowledge at our disposal to the problems and challenges we face every day.

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