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Conduct the Perfect Job Interview in Twelve Simple Steps

Conduct the Perfect Job Interview

  1. Truly understand what you need and and tailor everything in your selection process finding the perfect person.
  2. Determine how you will find the perfect person to fill need that need. You don't want the best of what you saw. You want the best person for the job.
  3. Explain the process to the interviewee.
  4. Have a background check on the candidate before the interview.
  5. Make the interview a conversation, not an interrogation.
  6. Always ask follow up questions.
  7. Spend as much time answering questions as you do asking.
  8. Describe the next steps, don't let him be the one who ask.
  9. Provide closure every time. Failing to follow up is incredibly rude.
  10. Observe on how they act with other people before the interview.
  11. Check out the references of the candidate.
  12. Conduct one more interview to be positive that you're choosing the right one.
  13. Make an enthusiastic offer.

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Conduct the Perfect Job Interview in Twelve Simple Steps

Conduct the Perfect Job Interview in Twelve Simple Steps

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140210135852-20017018-conduct-the-perfect-job-interview-in-twelve-simple-steps

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Key Idea

Conduct the Perfect Job Interview

  1. Truly understand what you need and and tailor everything in your selection process finding the perfect person.
  2. Determine how you will find the perfect person to fill need that need. You don't want the best of what you saw. You want the best person for the job.
  3. Explain the process to the interviewee.
  4. Have a background check on the candidate before the interview.
  5. Make the interview a conversation, not an interrogation.
  6. Always ask follow up questions.
  7. Spend as much time answering questions as you do asking.
  8. Describe the next steps, don't let him be the one who ask.
  9. Provide closure every time. Failing to follow up is incredibly rude.
  10. Observe on how they act with other people before the interview.
  11. Check out the references of the candidate.
  12. Conduct one more interview to be positive that you're choosing the right one.
  13. Make an enthusiastic offer.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Conduct the Effective Job Interview
  • Prepare your questions based on the attributes of an ideal candidate,
  • Reduce stress level. Tell the candidates in advance the questions you plan to ask.
  • Involve enoug...
Questions for the Important Traits

Grit- ask on how determined a person in pursuing his dreams.

Rigor- ask if there was a time he considered a data to make a decision.

Impact- ask for what he have co...

When asking questions on the candidate's unique contribution..

Probe: give me an example…

Dig: who, what, where, when, why and how on every accomplishment or project

Differentiate: we vs. I, good vs. great, exposure vs. expertise, participant vs. owner/leader, 20 yard line vs. 80 yard line

Applying STAR questions

SituationWhat's the background of what you were working on?

TaskWhat tasks were you given?

ActionWhat actions did you take?

Results- What results did you measure?

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Hire Originals at Startups
  • To develop a resilient culture. An environment with people who think differently will put you into much better position to continuous innovation.
  • To anticipate market movemen...
Originals and Where to Find Them
  • Unsung Heroes. For each major innovation or movement, there are catalysts that fade into the background of what they create.
  • Insubordinates. It's important to triage troublemakers, but in doing so, don't miss an original in your midst.
  • Those who have been fired. The ones who do not worry about pleasing others or fitting in.
  • Inward-facing innovators. People that even though work privately, create extreme impact.
Adam Grant
Adam Grant

“Values over rules are key for encouraging originality.”

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The reason for the question

Interviewers ask questions like "tell me about yourself "  to determine if you're qualified to do the work and if you will fit in with the team.

How to Answer the Question

It might be a good idea to share something about yourself that is doesn't relate directly to your career. 

For example, interests like running might represent that you are healthy and energetic. Pursuits like being an avid reader might showcase your intellectual leaning. Volunteer work will demonstrate your commitment to the welfare of your community.

The “present-past-future” formula

This is a simple formula to construct your response.

  • Start with a short overview of where you are now (which could include your current job along with a reference to a personal hobby or passion).
  • Reference how you got to where you are (you could mention education, or an important experience, internship or volunteer experience).
  • Finish by describing a probable goal for the future.

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What you should not say
  • Starting with something personal like family or hobbies, or launching into your life story.
  • Sharing the problems with your current job.
  • Summarizing your resume, point-by-point....
Craft an elevator pitch
  • Spend some time reviewing the job description in the recruitment ad for the position and research the company.
  • Prepare a short script that highlights the skills, strengths and expertise you have that make you especially qualified for this particular position. 
  • Explain the reasons you’re applying for this particular job. Focus on career-related motivations.
Your purpose to the question

Your purpose to the question "tell me about yourself" is to give just enough details of yourself to spark the interest of the interviewer.

Answering this question gives you a great opportunity to spotlight the skills and experience that make you the ideal candidate for the job.

The Job Interview
The Job Interview

Hunting for a job is a tricky process and may have many pitfalls. Many of us are not accustomed to having these kinds of conversations or handling the power dynamics of a job interview. There can b...

A Long Multi-Round Process

If you feel there is fog ahead of you due to opacity in the interview process and the multiple rounds, you can simply ask the next steps of the process and the timeline for a decision.

If you think the employer has an elongated set of rounds ahead, request to consolidate them if possible.

Stumped By A Question

Instead of bluffing your way through a question that you are completely stumped with, it is better to be upfront and handle it with honesty and grace. Tell them straight away that you do not know the answer to this question and what similar things you have done which have been effective.

Your life experiences are unique and not identical to what the interviewer is trying to ‘slot’ you into.

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The Art Of Hiring
The Art Of Hiring

Hiring, according to top corporate leaders, should not just be the standard job interview, which has become predictable and routine, but something creative and challenging.

One has to find ...

Interview, Unplugged

One has to check if the candidate is genuinely interested in the job or is just checking all boxes of dressing right and talking right to land up with an offer letter.

How they treat and interact with others (like the guy handing them the coffee) also helps gauge their personality. One can take the candidate on a tour inside the company building, noticing how they ask questions, or how curious they are.

The Interview Meal

Sharing a meal provides the recruiter with a big opportunity to observe the candidate, like how they make eye contact, how polite they are, or the way they ask questions.

One can see what frustrates or flusters them and if they are patient or agitated. The whole personality of the candidate can be gauged by one meal with them.

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Confirm with everyone

It's not uncommon for hiring managers to hand you over to someone else on the team to meet you at the last minute. Send a quick email to encourage them to plan: 

Hi Kamala, I’m really...

The interviewer’s LinkedIn and Twitter

Skim their history on LinkedIn, then move way down to the bottom. If they have endorsements and recommendations, it can give you a feel for their management style.

Twitter can help you guess at an interviewer's personality, interests, and values.

Your “about me” answer

Your interviewer will probably open with some form of "Tell me a little about yourself.Plan your answer using a few quick bullet points to keep things brief en then commit it loosely to memory.

  • Skip your personal history.
  • Give two or three sentences about your career path.
  • Mention how you decided to apply to this job.
  • Leave enough curiosity that the interviewer becomes excited to learn more about you.

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'So, Tell me about Yourself'

... or some version of that is one of the most fundamental and common questions asked in any first round of a Job Interview.

Hiring managers usually like to ask this question, because it ...

Short vs long answers

The conventional expert opinion is to provide a crisp, 30 second to 1-minute answer to the question "Tell me about yourself", but one minute isn’t enough time to deliver a meaningful response that benefits you as a candidate.

Experts prefer a short answer, as it has less chance of leading the candidate to drift or ramble.

Benefits of a long answer
  • A longer answer to "Tell me about yourself" allows you to provide a useful narrative beyond the résumé.
  • It lets you reveal key motivations that drove your career path.
  • You can shape the interview in your direction.
  • It's an opportunity to stand out from the other candidates.
"I’m a good problem solver"

Focusing on problem-solving implies that a candidate possesses secondary skills including critical thinking, strategic thinking, and leadership.

Demonstrate your problem-solving abilities...

"I’m a good communicator"

Communication encompasses not only speaking skills, but also your ability to lead, critique, and ask for help. Being adept in various communication methods also shows emotional intelligence.

"I have strong time management skills"

Time management is more than just completing tasks on time. An employer cares about how you spend the time leading up to a deadline as well.

Demonstrate your strength in this area by sharing how you prioritize your daily tasks.
Using the 80/20 rule for project prioritization can show how you best schedule your time to give your full attention to critical project tasks.

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